Prada’s Futuristic Linea Rossa Campaign

19.04.2019 | Blog , Fashion | BY:

This past week has seen the release of Italian fashion house Prada’s latest Linea Rossa campaign featuring their signature Linea Rossa logo with a bit of a twist.  The campaign shot and directed by Daniel Sannwald features the duo of models Lineisy Monero and Jun Young who are chic in the Linea Rossa looks from Prada’s SS19 collection. The pieces, all made from innovative, futuristic fabrics are the epitome of ultra-functional minimalism and futuristic sportswear combined with a sprinkle of modern elegance. It includes men’s, women’s and unisex garments that creates slim yet sharp silhouettes that gives the wearer an extra edge for respective occasions. The campaign itself is a technoid take on the classic technique of chronophotography, capturing multiple frames of a motion and combining them in single images. To shop Prada’s Linea Rossa, visit Prada. 

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Foam Talent Exhibition: May 15th

19.04.2019 | Art , Blog , Culture | BY:

For the third year in a row,  Amsterdam based international talent organisation Foam returns to Red Hook Labs in New York for their annual group exhibition Foam Talent. Set to debut on May 15, the exhibition will feature the work of twenty international photographers who were selected through the organisation’s annual talent call from a pool of 1853 creatives under the age of 35. 

The showcase will feature the works of these artists under several tabs of contemporary themes and topics such as social politics, nostalgia, night fall, homesickness and grief. A few of the names featured will include French duo Durimel,  Chinese photographer He Bo, Australian Sophie Gabrielle, Italian Salvatore Vitale, British Maisie Cousins, among others. For further info on how to cop tickets visit Foam

Cover image: “Untitled” from the series Worry for the Fruit the Birds Won’t Eat, 2018 by Sophie Gabrielle

“Kaelyn and the girls” from the series Frères dune île pas très proche, 2018 © Durimel
“Ants” from the series grass, peonies, bum, 2018 © Maisie Cousins
Model Angela and her personal story”, 2016, from the series Separation Anxiety, 2018- ongoing © Dima Komarov
“Untitled” from the series How to Secure a Country, 2015-2018 © Salvatore Vitale

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Fendi #MeAndMyPeekaboo No.9 ft The Quann Sisters

17.04.2019 | Blog , Fashion | BY:

For the 9th episode of their #MeAndMyPeekaboo series, Italian fashion house Fendi has joined forces with the exceptional genetic duo of the New York based creatives The Quann sisters. The short film, focuses on the strength of  sisters’ bond and features the two —  blogger and entrepreneur Cipriana Quinn and musician and music producer TK Wonder prancing around the streets of Manhattan with their Peekaboo bags in hand. 

The  #MeAndMyPeekaboo series began earlier this year featuring 10 iconic women across the world which included names like Kim Kardashian, Kris Jenner and North West. Each episode includes versions of the Peekaboo bags which have been seen on the Spring Summer 2019 runways with an updated soundtrack of Mary J Blige’s Family Affair.  To shop the Peekaboo visit Fendi. 

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Salone del Mobile: Maarten Baas,”I Think Therefore I Was”

15.04.2019 | Art , Blog | BY:

Salone del Mobile is the one time of year in Milan where one can discover the most interesting, jolting exhibitions and installations around the city. One of the most essential installations to see was that of Dutch designer Maarten Baas. Although not considered as design, the designer staged an exhibition in collaboration with Ventura Centrale entitled “I Think Therefore I Was.” Set in one of Ventura’s exhibition spaces in Centrale, the installation featured hundreds of monitors, playing fragments of videos in which the words ‘I think’ were cut from hundreds of random Youtube videos. This compilation of information is one that creates a great cacophony of words and moving images that hits you upon entrance.  Leaving one in awe with an overflow of feeling. There is no single screen to focus on, or single audio to listen to, there are hundreds being played simultaneously and what all that information does to the brain subconsciously is quite exciting.

Images by Claudio Grassi

“Having an opinion is once claim to existence. By placing the installation in reference to a catwalk set-up, the first impression is rather intimidating. The screens are like an audience, proclaiming opinions about you, as a visitor. Yet the other way around, it shows a colourful variety of people who have thoughts and therefore therefore are individuals,” comments Baas. The artist has been know for blurring boundaries between art and design using the element of surprise. The exhibition, which has already closed it’s doors, marked the artist’s 10th year in collaboration with the Ventura Projects in Milan. 

Images by Claudio Grassi

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Three Reasons To Go To MiArt

12.04.2019 | Art , Blog | BY:

Milan has quietly become a stealthy art hub. Its fair MiArt, which takes place the week before the city becomes obsessed with furniture and design in April, is like the Goldilocks’ porridge of art fairs. Its not too big, not too small. It has emerging names, big historical works and lesser known discoveries. The fair also is the catalyst for Milan Art Week when institutions like the Fondazione Prada, ICA Milan and Frigoriferi Milanesi open new exhibitions. These are examples of why you should book your ticket next year.

Saskia Te Nicklin At Vin Vin at MiArt

Danish artist Saskia Te Nicklin won the prize for best emergent booth at the fair this year, with her inventive Vienna-based gallery Vin Vin. Her paintings, installed against a metal wall installation, played with art historical themes such as still lives. Her refreshingly scrawled pieces touch on nature, the digital and the real. vinvin.eu

Five heads or masks executed while thinking of James Ensor, Saskia TeNicklin, 2019
4 plastic bags with drawn faces, Saskia Te Nicklin, 2019

Leigh Ledare at Office Baroque at MiArt

Brussels gallery Office Baroque brought some new large panel collage-like works from the always subversive Leigh Ledare to MiArt. These pieces felt more like disturbing scrapbook pages, which exposed Ledare’s own fascinations with sex, identity, history and social meaning. officebaroque.com

Leigh Ledare Plot I: Pre-existing Conditions, 2017
Leigh Ledare Plot III: Immune System, 2017

The Unexpected Subject. 1978 Art and Feminism in Italy

It is well worth travelling to the outskirts of Milan for this exceptional exhibition of Italian feminist art from the late 1970s. Discover artists like Ketty Le Rocco, Tomaso Binga, Lucia Marcucci, Maria Lai and Giulia Niccolai in this truly fascinating comprehensive archive show. At least pin down the catalogue until May 26, http://www.frigoriferimilanesi.it

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Prada Invites – Spring/Summer 2019

10.04.2019 | Blog , Fashion | BY:

Cover Image: The Yoke bag by Elizabeth Diller

On theme with Milan Design Week, today Prada Milano launches a series of projects titled Prada Invites in collaboration with three outstanding female architects. The Italian luxury house has invited Cini Boeri, Elizabeth Diller and Kazuyo Sejima to give their takes on the brand’s signature nylon fabric. For the project they are presented with the task of creating an accessory item for women and each artist produces something of a unique item. Italian architect Cini Boeri has conceptualised a functional bag that can expand and reduce according to its need or occasion; Japanese architect Kazuyo Sejima has crafted rather more playful designs with a long version dubbed the ‘daln’ and a curved version called ‘yooo.’ While American architect Elizabeth Diller’s designs — ‘The Yoke’ bag and ‘The Envelope’ garment bag cover a wider range of multiple functions. This new chapter of Prada’s venture is only a small display of their ongoing fascination with multifaceted representations of contemporary femininity. Prada Invites pieces are on sale with several different drops from the end of March until the beginning of May, in select Prada stores across the world. 

Daln bag by Kazuyo Sejima
Bag by Cini Boeri

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Salone Del Mobile: Fendi Casa x Cristina Celestino

10.04.2019 | Art , Blog | BY:

For Milan’s annual international design week, Italian luxury house Fendi has teamed up with renown Italian architect, designer Cristina Celestino for their latest project entitled “Back Home.” Fendi first tapped Celestino back in 2016 for their first successful collaboration, the “Happy Room” at Design Miami. The duo worked well enough that it was indeed deserving of a second collab,  which presents as the FENDI Casa’s “Back Home” line. The collection, on exhibition at the house’s showroom in Milan, is a celebration of the Maison’s iconic Pequin striped motif first produced back in 1987.

Throughout the exhibit Celestino produces a reinterpretation of the motif while using the house’s iconic patterns to create a wide creative range of furniture pieces in elegant marbles, onyxes and fascinating metallic surfaces. She creates a story centred around the iconic Pequin stripes using geometric armchairs and sofas with masculine designs to counterbalance the femininity of their shapes. A rose-like version of Fendi’s classic geometric motif also appears on coffee tables and carpets along with the FF logo. Influences of fashion are evident throughout the exhibit, a few mirrors and lamps were inspired by the silhouettes of cufflinks, cabinets echo a few of the houses stylistic codes with strong vertical lines, geometric shapes and bold curves. 

On site, the installation is divided into five parts, the Terrace, Entrance, Waiting Room, Dressing Room and Living Room. Each room evokes a different feeling with a general recollection of 70’s Roman house revised with bourgeois qualities. The FENDI Casa “Back Home” has its Milan doors open to the public until the 12th of April. 

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Saint Laurent Denim #YSL23 By Anthony Vaccarello

08.04.2019 | Blog , Fashion | BY:

This week Parisian fashion house Yves Saint Laurent released their latest #YSL23 all denim campaign. Under the art direction of Anthony Vaccarello, the campaign features a tribe of models sporting rock and roll inspired looks decked in sequinned bikini tops, frayed jean shorts, denim shirts and jackets with leopard print patchwork, waistcoats and other edgy YSL pieces. With a cast of models that includes Kaia Gerber, Simona Kust, Martina Boaretto, Mads, Mullin, Rebecca Leigh Longendke, Dakota Lindvall, Najib, Rai Langlois and Dylan Christensen, photographer Gary Sorrenti captures the eclectic voices of the fashion house’s denim collection while honing Vacarello’s signature punk aesthetic.  Discover more at YSL. 

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Hayward Gallery: “Kiss My Genders” 12 June – 8 Sep

05.04.2019 | Art , Blog , Culture | BY:

Cover Image: Martine Gutierrez, Masking Fish Mask from Indigenous Women (2018)

On June 12th this summer, central London art gallery Hayward Gallery will open it’s doors to a group exhibition titled ‘Kiss My Genders,’ showcasing the work of 30 international artists whose repertoires engage in conversation around gender identity. Curated by Vincent Honoré, the exhibition will feature a compilation of over 100 artworks by several generations of artists from across the world who share interests in articulating with themes of gender fluidity, non-binary, trans and intersex identities communicated throughout their work. The exhibition will include wide range of several types of media including installations, videos, paintings, sculptures, portraitures etc.

Juliana Huxtable Untitled Lil’ Marvel (2015)

The panel of creatives will include names who explore gender expression through the forms of performance, drag and masquerade. Such as names like Ajamu,  a London-based visual activist whose work challenges conventional understanding of sexuality, desire, pleasure and cultural production within contemporary Britain and Amrou Al-Kadhi, a British-Iraqi writer, drag performer and filmmaker, who in collaboration with British photographer Holly Falconer, created a photographic portrait Glamrou (2016) using triple exposure to communicate the experience of being in drag as a person of Muslim heritage. The exhibition will also bring forth political undertones with artist artist Hunter Reynolds who is an AIDS activist as well,  whouses art as a tool to process trauma as well as transform it. The Kiss My Gender exhibition will also be accompanied by an illustrated catalogue featuring original essays and a roundtable discussion with and from a few of the artists along with the exhibition’s curators and a performance by Berlin based artiste Planningtorock, whose song lyrics were featured as the showcase’s title. The exhibition will run throughout the summer and close its doors on September 2019. For more info visit Hayward Gallery.

Zanele Muholi, Phila I Parktown, (2016)
Catherine Opie, Mike and Sky (1993)

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Introducing Gucci’s Zumi -A playfully appealing accessory

04.04.2019 | Blog , Fashion | BY:

Earlier this week, Italian fashion house Gucci’s released one of their latest ventures which features the release of a new handbag. Creative director Alessandro Michele has casted L.A based actress and experimental musician Zumi Rosow as his muse as he created a line of bags inspired by her free spirited, creative spirit.  The bags, dubbed Gucci Zumi are accessories which feature a combination of the house’s signature motifs, being the interlocking G as well as the Horsebit hardware which was replicated from a rare piece of the house’s archives chosen by Michele.

Of course the bag is presented in several different versions —  the sophisticated top handle version, offered in medium and small —  this version is featured in smooth and grainy leather, python, elapse, ostrich and crocodile. The Gucci Zumi Shoulder bag is offered in the sizes mini and small and features the option to detach the leather strap, transforming into a clutch.  Michele also drew inspiration from a vintage 60’s bag for the tote version of the Zumi which was presented at the SS19 show and is offered only in crocodile and lizard skins.  The bag is also included in fun Gucci strawberry prints in the medium top handle and mini shoulder versions.  To shop visit Gucci.

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Public Gallery ft. Joan Cornellà: “IM GOOD THANKS”: Apr 3rd – May 4th

03.04.2019 | Art , Blog | BY:

London based contemporary space Public Gallery in collaboration with renowned Catalan artist Joan Cornellà presents ‘IM GOOD THANKS’ — a solo exhibition featuring the artist’s work set to open on the 3rd of April. The exhibition will feature a series of new works by Cornellà featuring his instantly recongisable mix of pitch black humour and deeply unsettling imagery as he gives his audience a glimpse of his dystopic view of contemporary life. Throughout the exhibition paintings will line the walls and surround a central sculpture which represents the artist’s trademark suited character. Each piece of work included in the upcoming exhibition acts as a mirror into the depraved nature of society; confronting topics like our obsessive attachment to social media and masturbatory selfie culture to politically controversial topics such as abortion , addiction and gender. Upon first glimpse the artist’s work may appear as playful and lighthearted but upon further thought and inspection it reveals his admirable method of twisting saccharine settings to dissect modern culture.

“I think we all laugh at misery. We must start from the idea that when we laugh, we laugh at someone or something. With empathy or not, there is always some degree of cruelty. In spite of that, I am aware that if one of my cartoons happened in real life , I would not laugh at al,” he comments. In sync with the growing feeling that the world is sinking further into depraved absurdity, Cornellà sheds some light unto human nature, presenting us in his notoriously dark and disquieting manners. The exhibition is set to run until the 4th of May.

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Illustrating Fashion with Christina Zimpel

01.04.2019 | Art , Blog , Fashion | BY:

Broad strokes, dense colour, a sense of positive circularity to her work – Christina Zimpel is an artist of a wonderfully bold disposition. Being an Australian in New York City, her work has lifted the pages of Vogue Australia to the SS19 handbags (and set design) of Michael
Kors. There is a natural magnetism to her illustrations, often heavily centred around reinterpretations of the runway or figures of fashion. Christina breaks down familiar catwalk looks into bright colour comparisons of ink and gouache (think green against pink, red beside baby blue), or almost-Surrealistic monochrome, creating confident combinations.
Large almond eyes are bestowed on her interpretations, and for all the magnetism of their form and colour, look out with a gentleness: a reflection of the artist? May Christina Zimpel’s illustrative hand continue: she creates illustrations that lift the page through colour and composition.

What do you do for fun, what’s your favourite colour?

For fun I eat and garden and go for walks. My favourite colour is currently
a mossy green. 

What were you good at in school, what were you not so good at?

I enjoyed history and art and creative writing. I did not pay enough attention to maths and biology.


Who were you favourite bands growing up? Who do you listen to these days?
I like the same bands today as I did growing up… Bowie, Roxy Music, Kraftwerk, Prince, Miles Davis, The Clash, Joy Division etc etc. all really great to work to. And my son Lil Jabba!
 

How did you get into art and illustration?
I got into art by suddenly deciding I wanted to draw – so I drew everything I could see around me every day for a couple of years and shared the results on Instagram. Illustration commissions started coming due to that. In the past it might have been harder to get my foot in the door. However, now I have an audience and some great people saw something interesting in me and gave me work which is wonderful!

Describe a day in your life .
I am quite boring especially in winter when I barely leave the house! I work at home so I am up and working at the kitchen table. I can multi task as the dishwasher and stove are close to my brushes and paints. In the summer I get to go outside and do a bit of gardening or walk around my neighbourhood if I need a break.

Your work appears to be shaped greatly by blocks of colour: does colour or form come first for you when you start a piece?
When I’m painting, colour is an important starting point. I have a definite palette and love to work within those parameters. My colour choices come from distant memories when I became really conscious of my surroundings. The sixties pop colours, the clarity of bright reds and greens and pink my mother loved. They form my landscapes. With illustrations I tend to be influenced by the subject matter be it fashion or narratives. Using very bright colours is tricky so I add banal colours to balance them, otherwise you’d get a headache.

Do you doodle?
I love to doodle! That is something I’ve always done.

You are from Perth yet currently reside in New York: do aspects of either Australia or New York enter your work?
Definitely- Australia is a land of bright clear colours and I like the uplifting feelings it gives me, it ties in with the Fauvist paintings I love so much.
New York really gives me so much love for humanity… so many people all the time all living their lives right in front of you. It really comes out in my work – observations of people’s expressions, body language, the heaviness of life.

Does your mind drift as you draw or does drawing help your mind drift?
I have always been the anxious type. Drawing is the best help I’ve found to drift away from my thoughts and tune out the chatter. It makes me live in the moment.  In the UK, the government is increasingly moving focus away from the arts, leaving a potential massive gap in young people’s education of art.

How important is art to you?
When you are exposed to the arts there is something each person will find interesting or beautiful or earth shattering amongst it. All people should get the opportunity to open up their world and find their own creativity or passions. It shouldn’t be a luxury.


You have worked with the likes of the CFDA, Maison Kitsune and Michael Kors: what role has collaboration played in your career?
I was really lucky to work with some iconic brands in 2018. I had the opportunity to draw portraits, landscapes and create brand identities. I had my first merchandise produced – totes and phone cases and T-shirt’s, as well as beautiful look books and interactive displays. It’s been really exciting and it’s giving me hope that I can grow exponentially, and be collaborative, not just work in a bubble.

What was the last thing that made you excited?
The whole thing- I did not see any of this coming!

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“Tim Walker: Wonderful Things” – The Visionary’s Largest Exhibition To Date comes to London

30.03.2019 | Art , Blog , Fashion | BY:

Cover Image: Duckie Thot, Aubrey’s shadow © Tim WalkerStudio

This Autumn London’s largest museum Victoria and Albert is set to host an exhibition on one of fashion’s most celebrated photographers Tim Walker. Titled Tim Walker: Wonderful Things , the exhibition is scheduled to open on September 21st, and will include the largest collection of Walker’s images to date. Curated & designed by leading creative director and Walker’s long-term collaborator Shona Heath , the exhibit will feature 10 new photographic projects which have been directly influenced by the V & A’s vast collection. In preparation for the exhibit, the photographer scoured the museum 145 public galleries, scaled the roof of the 12 acre South Kensington site and explored the labyrinth of Victorian passages below level. Where he encountered , antique jewellery , erotic illustrations, the museum’s largest photograph as well as many other rare artefacts to serve as inspiration for the projects. 

“To me, the V&A has always been a palace of dreams – it’s the most inspiring place in the world. The museum’s collection is so wide and eclectic, and I think that’s why it resonates with me so much. Many of the objects that I saw during my research at the museum made my heart swell and I wanted to try to create a photograph that would relate not only to the physical presence and beauty of that object, but also to my emotional reaction to it. Each new shoot is a love letter to an object from the V&A collection, and an attempt to capture my encounter with the sublime. For me, beauty is everything. I’m interested in breaking down the boundaries that society has created, to enable more varied types of beauty and the wonderful diversity of humanity to be celebrated. Preparing for this exhibition over the past three years has pushed me into new territories, which is very exciting, and I’m at a stage in my life where I feel brave enough to do that,” said the man himself. 

‘Tilda Swinton’, Renishaw Hall, Derbyshire, 2018 (c) Tim Walker Studio

The exhibition will begin with  showcasing over 300 items including short films, photographic sets, props, sketches, scrapbooks and other items from which Walker drew inspiration as well 100 photographs from his previous projects. It will the continue into 10 additional rooms filled with the photographer’s work work inspired by the V & A, his films installations and evocative sets and props alongside the images they inspired.  The exhibition will take it’s bow on March 08, 2020. For more information, visit V & A. 

‘Zo, Kiran Kandola, Firpal, Yusuf, Ravyanshi Mehta, Jeenu Mahadevan, Chawntell Kulkami, Radhika Nair’, Pershore, Worcestershire, 2018 (c) Tim Walker Studio
‘Karen Elson, Sgaire Wood & James Crewe’, London, 2018 (c) Tim Walker Studio

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LVMH Prize Top 8 Finalists

28.03.2019 | Blog , Fashion | BY:

Earlier this year the LVMH Prize announced the top twenty designers selected since it’s worldwide open call for their sixth edition in running. The batch was a diverse group of creatives including London based talents Kiko Kostadinov, Richard Malone and Paria Farzaneh. Kenneth Ize from Nigeria, New York based Caroline Hu among several others who presented their collections last month in Paris at the LVMH HQ for industry insiders. 

Since then, the Prize’s panel of experts including Naomi Campbell, Pat McGrath, Adrian Joffe and Jefferson Hack have narrowed down the list to 8 finalists. The revised list is as follows: 

KENNETH IZE

“At Kenneth Ize we focus on reinterpreting examples of Nigerian craft to create an original perspective on luxury production within textile and fashion. We work with a community of weavers, and also with a variety of artisan and design groups across Nigeria. The label is devoted to the long established traditions of craft and local artisanship, merging a contemporary design aesthetic and new production skills with a specifically local handcraft practice. It is an approach we hope to expand upon to include other design cultures around Africa and abroad. There is the strong belief that in exploring and nurturing existing cultures, one opens up an exciting territory for creating and inspiring future traditions.” 

STEFAN COOKE

The London-based Stefan Cooke brand is directed by Cooke and his partner Jake Burt. The pair are currently working on their Fourth Season, Spring/Summer 20. The combination of Cooke’s subversion of textile techniques and Burt’s skill for silhouette and design underpins the signature style of the pairs’ forthcoming looks. Original techniques and collaboration is at the heart of the process for their work and continues to be a force of innovation.

THEBE MAGUGU

Thebe Magugu is a young designer based in Johannesburg, South Africa. Originally from the small town of Kimberley, he moved to Johannesburg to study fashion design, fashion photography and fashion media from LISOF. After winning best graduate collection, he interned and worked for a selection of designers fashion institutions and retailers. After 2 years, he began his namesake label, THEBE MAGUGU – a South African fashion brand primarily operating within the field of women’s ready to wear.

Speaking about the brand, the designer says, “together with our pillar values of quality, novelty and culture, we constantly seek new ways of presenting women with clothing that both complies with and enhances the everyday. Sleek, forward-looking design intersects with motifs from our continent’s storied past, providing smart, multifaceted clothes as valuable as their woman”.

PHIPPS  – by Spencer Phipps

Spencer Phipps was born and raised in San Francisco. He studied at Parsons School of Design in New York City graduating in 2008 with a nomination as “designer of the year” for his final year collection – an initial exploration of sustainable fashion. He started his career at Marc Jacobs as part of the menswear design team and after, relocated to Antwerp to work with Dries Van Noten as their first American menswear designer. He is currently based in Paris where he pursues his passion for rock climbing and other outdoor activities.

HED MAYNER

The sacred and the traditional are both part of Mayner’s world, as well as a passion for authentic menswear pieces, which he likes to twist and rework. His clothes can be passed on from father to son, escaping the transient nature of designer fashion. Focusing on a substantial and stylish wardrobe of everyday separates, his debut collection emphasizes comfort and self-expression, underlining the universal appeal of archetypal clothes. Addressing the essentials of a male wardrobe -from a sleeveless trench jacket and a pair of loose jeans to a roomy bomber or draped white t-shirt- he roots his sartorial vision within an appreciation of honesty and sincere clothing, as well as an interest in the finer details. Impeccably tailored and constructed, the designer’s clothes are as beautiful inside as they are on the outside, evoking a subtle sense of luxury which must be felt and experienced instead of being seen.

BODE – by Emily Adams Bode

Emily Adams Bode was born and raised in Atlanta, Georgia. After studying in Switzerland, she moved to New York and graduated from Parsons School of Design and Eugene Lang College with a BA/BFA dual-degree in menswear design and philosophy. Bode expresses a sentimentality for the past through the study of personal narratives and historical techniques. Modern workwear silhouettes united with female centric traditions of quilting, mending, and appliqué shape the collections. Each piece of clothing tells a story, and is tailor-made in New York and New Delhi.

BETHANY WILLIAMS

Bethany Williams is a pioneering British menswear designer committed to exploring social and environmental change within her work and working with marginalised parts of society to bring about positive change and social enterprise. At a time in which socio-politics are at the forefront of many designer’s minds, this pioneering designer isn’t just protesting bur rather offering solutions and call-to-actions.  For her collection Women for Change, she has worked closely with female prisoners and the San Patrignano drug dependency program. Bethany Williams, a London-based sustainable fashion designer, focuses our attentions onto women’s rehabilitation for spring/summer 18. For Bethany’s most recent collection she has collaborated with Adelaide House, a women’s shelter based in Liverpool, one of only six such facilities in the country. Adelaide House provides a safe place for women leaving prison with various needs including domestic violence and homelessness. 

ANREALAGE –  by Kunihiko Morinaga

Born in  Kunitachi, Tokyo Kunihiko Morinaga began making clothes in Vantan Design Academy while he was still in Waseda University and launched his own brand “ANREALAGE” in 2003.
ANREALAGE is a combination of the words ”REAL, UNREAL and AGE’’.
The name, ANREALAGE was born from a desire to create real clothes for everyday use while utilizing ultimate dimensions, original concepts, and unique elements. Our collections utilize three key elements. These are “hand craft work”, “conceptual shaping” and “technology” under the mantra of “God is in the details”. In 2005, ANREALAGE won the Design Vision Award For Avant Garde at Gen Art competition for new designer in New York. In 2011, we won the 29th Mainichi Fashion Grand Prix for the best new designer in Tokyo. In 2014, we participated in the Paris Fashion Week, starting with Spring/ Summer 2015. We held “A LIGHT UN LIGHT”, the exhibition with clothes of collections in Paris, in Japan. 

The Prize’s winner , to be decided later this year will receive 300,000 euros and a one-year mentorship program facilitated by the LVMH team. The Prize also acknowledges three young graduates who have completed a course in fashion school by presenting them with an opportunity to join the creative team at one of the houses of the group for a year as well as a 10,000 euro grant.

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Cadogan Contemporary: Chance Encounters, Ilana Manolson

27.03.2019 | Art , Blog | BY:

London based gallery Cadogan Contemporary recently teamed up with Canadian painter and botanist Ilana Manolson for the conception of a solo exhibition titled Chance Encounters. Set to open on April 23rd, the exhibition will be Manolson’s debut showcase in the city and will feature over 20 of her acrylic paintings with themes of representation and abstraction presented in ways which challenge traditional depictions of nature in nature in art. 

 A trained botanist, Manolson offers the viewer an intimate and profound knowledge of the natural world , she began painting while working at Canada’s National Park system in Alberta, where her office became a de facto art studio. Eventually, her passion and talent led her to study printmaking and painting at one of America’s most prestigious art schools, The Rhode Island School of Design.

 “I  see being a naturalist and being a painter as being very much related in that you are looking at an environment closely, looking over time and looking for the details that explain the larger whole,” the artist explained. The showcase will make its run throughout mid April and take its bow on the 10th of May.  

Cover Image : Yarrow, 2017; Shape of a trek, 2018; Wind teaser, 2018-19; Hunter, 2019 © Ilana Manolson, courtesy of Cadogan Contemporary

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Twin Magazine: Infinite Scroll

26.03.2019 | Blog , Fashion | BY:

In a special series of images for Twin, we unpack the idea that perfection is on the surface. In a social media age, nothing is more important than owning your best self on the inside. You know who you are: strong, powerful and empowered. That will never change, but that doesn’t mean you can’t switch it and experiment for kicks – this #betterfacechallenge is served with a wink and a smile. Online is the space to play, take ownership of the fun you can have, all the while knowing that your perfect self is in all your imperfections.

Models Moffy at Storm, Elaine at Nii, Lola at The Squad, Aoi at Tomorrow Is Another Day, Melody at The Hive, Make Up Siddhartha Simone at Julian Watson Agency using CHANEL Vision d’Asie: L’Art du Détail and CHANEL Rouge Coco Flash, Hair Anna Cofone at The Wall Group, Script/Writing Sonya Titus

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Gucci Jewellery ft. Florence Welch -Bohemian Elegance

22.03.2019 | Blog , Fashion | BY:

Earlier this week Italian fashion house Gucci launched it’s new advertising campaign featuring their jewellery ambassador and longtime friend, musician, singer, songwriter, producer Florence Welch. A match made in heaven , Florence is to Gucci as Madonna is to Gaultier or in even simpler terms as bread is to butter. Shot by photographer Colin Dodgson, the campaign features Welch in a retro styled wooden wagon surrounded by a bed of colourful decorative bohemian styled fabrics and furniture as she poses for the camera adorned in the house’s stylised rings, bracelets and necklaces. The artist’s light, nonchalant luxurious mood pairs perfectly with the garments and bijouterie carefully selected from Gucci’s Le Marché des Merveilles, Gucci Ourboros, Gucci Flora and Dionysus fine jewellery collections. Visit Gucci to discover more.

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Twin Issue XX

20.03.2019 | Blog , Twin Book | BY:

Issue 20 celebrates a landmark in Twin’s history: 10 years of championing women and emerging creativity. Fittingly, this issue is packed with interviews and contributors that embody our independent and boundary pushing spirit. Who more emblematic of that ethos than Katharine Hamnett? Her radical vision has consistently held power to account and advocated for sustainable values and the power of education. Or boxer Ramla Ali, who knocked out the idea that ‘women don’t box’ and became a champion – inside and outside of the ring. Both women shattered existing expectations to establish new rules of their own. Also in this issue, filmmaker Fenn O’Meally and poet Debris Stevenson talk feminism, community and creativity, dismantling the system one punchy takedown at a time. You’ll want to read this interview twice. These are the influencers of our times, but we’ve also asked leading creatives to talk about the icons who came before. Designers Michael Halpern, Mimi Wade and Art School’s Tom Barratt contribute loving family portraits of the women who originally inspired them. 

This anniversary, community is key. In ‘Queens of Scampia’, photographer Jess Kohl offers an intimate portrait of the trans women in northern Naples, while Lotte van Raelte’s discusses her open, natural portraits of women’s bodies in all their unique wonder. Francesca Allen’s ‘Tokyo Girls’ is a love letter to women and the city, while back in Britain, artists Jeremy Deller talks Stonehenge and his collaboration with Aries. And with a similar nod to the pagan, photographer Steph Wilson’s ‘White Nightmare’ conjures surreal and weird world where the white male has been overpowered and the freakish and strange rule. Looking back to look forward, Philomena Epps reflects on the original contributed for our first issue, in the context of where we are now. “The Age of Aquarius will last for another 2000 years”, she says, “but will we?”

Given the innovative creatives that have helped to promote original thinking over Twin’s last 10 years, the answer is probably, yes. The range of talent that has helped to establish the magazine’s pioneering voice is a reason to be optimistic about the future. Here’s to a bright, bold and disruptive decade ahead.

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“The Coromandel Collection” – Chanel’s Ode to Madame Gabrielle C.

19.03.2019 | Blog , Fashion | BY:

Gabrielle Chanel was said to have been one who lived a figurative lacquered box where sailing ships, palaces, flowers and birds plaited in flashes of gold and deep red stood out against the darkness of light. This fantasy landscape meant so much to her that she often wished to always carry this fantasy in a portable form. This was how her love for Coromandel screens was first discovered in 1910 on a journey with her great love Boy Capel. “The first time I saw a coromandel screen, I cried out: It’s so beautiful! I had never said that about any other object,” said Madame Chanel.

The French fashion house which lives in on in her name recently chose to honour their founder’s passion with a high jewellery collection of fifty-nine pieces inspired by coromandel screens. The collection includes twenty-four pieces which are entirely unique with reworked motifs around the themes of floral, noticeably evoking her signature flower, the Camellia; animal, through the bestiary of Coromandel; and mineral, reflecting her love of crystal and gemstones.

The Fleur De Laque Necklace

The designer was undoubtedly greatly inspired by the intricacies of these Chinese Coromandels which often included art of flora and faunas. She would muse upon the screens and attach photographs and drawings to create a sort of moodboard  or theatre in which she would often immerse herself. “When I look at this screen in the evening for example,”she continued, “ I see doors opening and knights setting off on a horseback.”

At the heart of this animal theme, the workshop captures a flock of in flight birds as they appear on some of the designer’s screens in an ornament diamond right that boasts over ten carats. The collection’s gems also calls on the colours of the Coromandel lacquers which includes the greens of the Tsavorite garnet, emeralds and the over thirty-seven carat tourmaline on the “Vibration Minérale” ring; the red spinel on the “Evocation Florale” ring and the ruby beads and deep hypnotic black lacquer transposed onto the onyx. To shop or view the full collection visit CHANEL


The Évocation Florale necklace
Coco Chanel (1883-1971), couturière française. Paris, 1937.

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TO READ: “It’s Not About The Burqa” – As told by an Ingenious Collective of Muslim Women

18.03.2019 | Blog , Literature | BY:

During a time where Islamophobia and Xenophobia are still currently on the rise,  “It’s Not About The Burqa” conceived and edited by writer and activist Mariam Khan is an essential hardcover offering insightful unique perspectives from inside the Muslim community. Published by Pan Macmillan earlier this year, the book features an anthology of 17 informative essays from 17 of Britain’s Muslim female youth brought together by Khan as they reflect on their stories of oppression, the lazy stereotyping, misogyny and islamophobia. 

Mariam’s concept for the book was triggered when she first came across a report about a leaked conversation had by British Prime Minister David Cameron and one of his officials where he expressed his views of the “traditional submissiveness” of Muslim women being a key problem in the fight against Islamic extremism. Mariam soon grew tired of conversations like this being had about the definitions and needs of Muslim women by parties that were neither female or muslim. 

From this, the idea was conceived to unite the voices of these women with different stories ranging from funny , to warm, to sad and angry, as they discuss freely the hijab, the wavering faith, love and divorce, feminism, queer identity, sex etc.  “I wanted a book that let Muslim women speak on their own terms, without being spoken over, about whatever they wanted and for that not to have to go through a white filter. We had to have a platform of all sorts of voices, and represent the vast experiences. I couldn’t edit the book thinking, ‘I don’t agree with that,”said Khan.

The book counteracts the media’s distorted definition of a Muslim woman being “all about the burqa” and gives insight to what it’s truly like. Mariam’s chapter titled “Feminism Needs To Die” discusses her experience as a feminist as she came to the realization that mainstream “white” feminism did not have room or wasn’t interested in accommodating the choices she makes in regards to her faith. Each essay, with titles like The First Feminist (Sufiya Ahmed) , Immodesty is the Best Policy (Coco Khan) , Hijabi [R]evolution (Afshan D’Souza-Lodhi) and Not Just A Black Muslim (Raifa Rafiq), presents a unique testimony from a few of the only voices we should be listening to about the journey of what it’s like to be a Muslim woman in 2019. To get your copy visit INATB.

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