LVMH Prize 2019 – Open Call For Young Designers

18.12.2018 | Blog , Fashion | BY:

The LVMH Prize in it’s sixth edition since it’s launch has once again casted an open call for young designers.  The Prize is opened to designers under 40 all across the world who have produced at least womenswear, menswear or unisex collections.  The winner will receive 300,000 euros and a one-year mentorship program facilitated by the LVMH team. The Prize also acknowledges three young graduates who have completed a course in fashion school by presenting them with an opportunity to join the creative team at one of the houses of the group for a year as well as a 10,000 euro grant.  Last year’s winner Japanese designer Masayuki Ino was selected from among 1,300 candidates from across 90 countries, judged by a panel of International experts from the fashion industry. For more information visit LVMH.

Tags: ,

A deeper look(book): Isoscles, September 2018

17.12.2018 | Blog , Culture , Fashion | BY:

Isoscles’ lookbook reads like an inverted case of sharking, caught on the streets of Rome. There is an invited gaze – the woman is aware of herself as much as her vision. It almost reads as chapter five of John Berger’s ways of seeing: the self-awareness women profess and express. At the back of the SS19 imagery her friend and collaborator Cara Sheffler explores an experience of being up-skirted in New York, and the sensations she went through, parallel to how others perceived the act.

Taking ownership of how we are presented and how we present ourselves — not just to others but to ourselves — in a way requires us to objectify ourselves. The female gaze needs to supersede the male. 

Isosceles is a brand launched by Cicely Travers after a life of obsession for underwear, looking to create a label that gives pleasure to women in their own bodies. 

Currently supported by the British Fashion Council’s NEWGEN scheme and in her fourth season, Cicely is illuminating the new frontier more brands are exploring- what we wear closest to our skin and how that comes to shape how we feel about ourselves for ourselves. 

Utilising sheer mesh, bright colours and unique panelling, Isosceles pulls the eye to her garments, and in turn the body itself. Through these bold combinations, it does not shy away, but it also does not define: it merely enhances what was there – a spirit, a mentality, a personality, a woman. 

As Cara Sheffler concludes on upskirting herself in order to explore her body and personal perception of it, If that isn’t self-possession, I cannot tell you what is. 

Isosceles Lingerie

What made you begin your brand Isosceles?

I started making knickers after I dropped out of art school – it was the only thing I was really motivated to do. After completing a degree in contour fashion and having little success in getting to the kinds of jobs I wanted,  I went for an internship with Jean Yu in New York. I was so inspired her work: its exquisitely beautiful couture silk lingerie, and her refusal to compromise her aesthetic. It was a form of art. It took me five years after that to build up the courage to start my brand but it happened in the simplest of ways- I found this fantastic fluorescent stretch mesh in Shepherds Bush and played around with cutting shapes and wrapping the body. It went from there. 

What was the inspiration behind your last collection? 

I always look to vintage lingerie, and sportswear for inspiration: for my September 2018 collection this was mixed with clubwear and harlequins. I’m inspired by the fabric I’m using and a lot of ideas come from draping on the stand. I feel there are constraints as to how creative I can be with my brand because Isosceles Lingerie is functional as well as innovative. I strive to push the boundary into what lingerie can be whilst acknowledging that lingerie is something that has to support and should be harmonious or complementary to your outer wear. 

Isosceles Lingerie

What did you want to explore in your September 2018 look book imagery? 

The photographer Amy Gwatkin and I were inspired by the photographer Roy Stuart who takes soft porn pics of ladies semi-exposed in public: we wanted to play with those themes of exhibitionist and voyeur. We made an early decision that the subject should always look in control and was taking pleasure from flashing, thus subverting the male gaze. I always try to ensure that models don’t look submissive in my imagery. It was also a fun opportunity to show how lingerie can amplify the enjoyment of wearing clothes. 

Isosceles Lingerie

What does sexy mean to you? 

Pure, guiltless pleasure. 

Do you think attitudes towards lingerie are changing? Is it made for the female gaze as much as the male gaze? 

From my perspective, I don’t think wearing nice lingerie has very much to do with the male gaze at all. It’s about feeling good in your skin, in your clothes, feeling beautiful and cherishing your body by wearing beautiful fabrics and colours next to your skin. Wearing a bra that fits you and improves your shape, changes your posture, puts a spring in your step: I enjoy the playfulness of it. I think we need to embrace these pleasures and love our bodies more. I would like to put a little more seduction into the everyday. 

I’m seeing a lot of great women run lingerie brands that are making lingerie directed to the female gaze and changing attitudes about the importance of lingerie. 

Isosceles Lingerie

What do you want your audience to take away from your brand? 

That they could see themselves wearing it and having fun with the bright colours. I hope that people see it as a brand with a conscience. 

If your brand was a song/album/book/film, what would it be?

If it were a book it would be Don’t Cry by Mary Gaitskill. It’s a collection of her short stories, one of my favourites is called “A dream of men”. It’s funny and insightful: she is such a compassionate writer and I think it’s important to be compassionate as a designer especially in this day and age.
If it were an album it would be The B52’s album of the same name because its irreverent, funny, and great to dance to and it was made in the year I was born. 

Isosceles Lingerie

Can underwear be a bonding mechanism for women? 

To me, yes. For example it was fascinating to do the shoot with a totally female team. We had a lot of fun and a lot of great talks about the way we feel about our bodies. You realise that everyone has body hang-ups, even people who seem confident. We all have complicated relationships with our bodies:  its liberating to strip off and strip away the facade. 

Tags: ,

Marni Resort 2019 – Compulsive Harmony

14.12.2018 | Blog , Fashion | BY:

“Gentle subversion. Looking at reality through a filter, in pursuit of extreme beauty. “

A freshly-released Marni resort 2019 collection focuses on magnifying the traits of romanticism and elegance through the forms of pastel coloured, delicate established silhouettes. Designer Francesco Riso waved his magic wand and created a harmonious collection tied together by feminine distorted, draped and pleated pieces. Demure jackets, voluminous skirts, languid dresses, puffy skirts and soft printed dresses paired with metal-toed shoes and soft coloured leather jackets . The collection feels like a haiku pieced together by a delicate sophisticated feminist to her ex lover with the intentions of letting them know about the great strength she has gained from the horrible break up, with not too much but just enough words. Like an evening primrose, a flower which blooms in darkness, an enchantress of love which has metamorphosed her pain into a collection of welded silk, nylon, ostrich leather, denim and crepe de chine as a gesture of freedom. To view the full collection, visit Marni. 

Tags: ,

PH Museum 2018 Women Photographers Grant Winners

13.12.2018 | Art , Blog , Culture | BY:

Earlier this year the PH Museum announced the opening of their second annual women’s photography grant. The aim of the project geared towards female and non-binary photographers was to empower women from all sectors of photography from all corners of the world, regardless of age, colour and orientation. Recently, after great deliberation, the organization announced the winners of their 2018 grant.  With a jury composed of Aïda Muluneh (Photographer, Filmmaker and Curator), Alessandra Sanguinetti (Photographer), Karen McQuaid (Senior Curator, The Photographers’ Gallery) and Pamela Chen (Creative Lead, Instagram), the PH Museum awarded the first prize to the project “You Don’t Look Native To Me” by Romanian-born German photography Maria  Sturm who took the prize of £5,000 in cash along with additional opportunities for exposure.  “From all the submissions , it was not difficult for us to be drawn to the work of Maria Strum, capturing Native American youth and exploring the notion of identity in the American landscape. One of the key factors for selecting her work was not only based on her technical skills, but on her approach in capturing images that offer the viewer as a sympathetic and non-cliched insight into her subjects. In essence, her collection offers us a glimpse into a long term project that portrays a community at the crossroads of the past and future,” explained Aïda Muluneh.  The second prize of £2,000 was assigned to the work of  Australian photographer Sinead Kennedy, entitled Set Fire to The Sea, which was a project exploring the Australian Government’s policy of mandatory and indefinite detention for asylum seekers.  The third prize of £1,000 was claimed by Turkish photographer Sabiha Çimen whose work “KKK (Quran School For Girls)” documented the daily life of girls in attempt to memorise and practice the Quran in Instanbul, Turkey. “Sabiha leads us into the life of rituals and quiet rebellion in a strictly religious girls’ boarding school with a classic and disarmingly poetic approach. She presents the girls with gentleness and empathy while managing to capture the tension between the girls childlike, awkward play and the intense adult rules, expectations and limitations that are upon them,” explains Alessandra Sanguinetti. Additional prizes were also awarded to photographers whose works were too good to go unnoticed in the forms of honourable mentions, mini grants, Vogue Italia features and an opportunity for exhibition.

1st Prize | You Don’t Look Native To Me by Maria Sturm
2nd Prize | To Set Fire To The Sea by Sinead Kennedy
3rd Prize | KKK (Quran School For Girls) by Sabiha Çimen

Tags: , ,

Hyun Mi Nielson Spring/Summer 2019

10.12.2018 | Blog , Fashion | BY:

Founder of Hyun Mi Nielsen, Christine Mi Nielsen is an experienced and ambitious Danish designer who has creatively served at some of the most renowned fashion houses such as Givenchy, Balenciaga and head womenswear designer at Alexander McQueen. Throughout her journey, she has worked with and under many creatives at the helm of these houses known for their distinctive and at times iconic pieces. However in July of 2016, after her departure from Balenciaga, the designer  decided to launch her own label, “ I have never wanted to start my own label. The thought never occurred to me until I was asked: “Why don’t you start your own?!”.  That was where it all began, since then she has been invited by the French Fashion Federation to showcase during Couture Week and has launched four couture collections. The latest being Spring/Summer 2019, entitled hybrids. The collection explores the fusions made possible by a multicultural world, veiled sheep herds, fetish culture and post war street style. The construction, styling and photography has a punk poetic ring which leaves you in some sort of trance craving for more.  Plunging necklines, leather bustiers and distorted colourful prints, Twin sits down with the designer to get further insight on the collection.

What was the inspiration behind the most recent collection? 

Magpies, travellers, 70’ties, free spirits, punk, there are also a soft under current of SM and something ethnic. 

Would you say your work and style has somewhat been influenced by the designers you’ve previously worked with? 

I think all people to some degree or another is shaped by their past and my working life is a part of my past.

Where , what or who do you look to for inspiration ? 

I get inspired by the most things in nature, art or just walking down the street. I love to do research, images or developing techniques or volumes. But I have some reoccurring themes I love punks, free spirits, 70’ties etc.

What fashion school did you attend and when did you graduate ? 

I did my BA at The Danish Design School – today it the school has changed name  and become a part of The Royal Academie of Arts in Copenhagen, Denmark. I graduated my MA from the Royal College of Art and Design in London.

How does music and pop culture influence your brand (if it does)? 

I listen to a lot of different music, and definitely love pop music. I for example love artist like Beyonce and the British singer Farai.

What person in the public eye today would you class as the Hyun Mi Nelsen poster woman? 

There are alot of strong, working women I’d love to see dressed in HYUN MI NIELSEN. But as you ask, ‘in the public eye’, my answer is Beyonce. She has already worn the label in the video Apeshit. I’d love to see her dressed in it again.

You of course have a tonne of experience under your belt, working with different designers and attending fashion school. Do you think it’s absolutely compulsory to attend fashion school to be a designer or is gaining sufficient experience enough to get started? 

No, today is not necessary. But why go? It is FUN! And you have time to experiment in a supportive, creative environment and meet like minded people.

What’s next for you ?  A/W 19 and lot of adventures.

Tags: , , , ,

Pitti Uomo ’95 – Everything to expect

10.12.2018 | Blog | BY:

Italian corporation Pitti Uomo Immagine recently unveiled the creative direction behind the 95th international menswear trade show set for next January in Florence: The Pitti Box, the main theme of the fall/winter fairs which was inspired the common theme of surprise throughout all of the fair’s past events. They call this factor The Surprise Box — a palate of various extraordinary tin containers of ideas and innovations which are subject to change based on the season’s trends. Pitti promises to offer its guests a multi sensory journey in and out of “the box” in a set design curated by life-styler Sergio Colantuoni . “The Piitti Box aims for the surprise factor” says Agostino Poletto, General Manager of Pitti Imagine, “and for a new attitude of rigour and elegance, which we can feel in the air after some more pop-oriented editions. The path of Pitti Uomo will be marked by many ‘boxes’ , with which we want to involve our audience in a series of experiences curated by us. They will be designed as a place of comfort and entertainment, but above all an invitation to meet and share ideas and suggestions even in the social world. Breathing a fresh unique energy of the fair.” On tune with their theme of streetwear elegance, the fair will also welcome Parisian menswear label Y/Project as the Menswear guest designer, whose creative director Glenn Martens will present their Fall Winter 2019/20 collection with a special event.  “Florence’s exquisite heritage has been a never ending source of fascination to me. I’m extremely honoured to have been asked to show Y/Project at Pitti Uomo, in the core of this mythical city”, says Glenn Martens, Creative Director, Y/Project. Also on the line up is Italian urban culture company Slam Jam which will be celebrating thirty years in the business with a collaboration with some of it’s long standing partners. This will be featured as a multidisciplinary exhibition at the Museo Marino Marini along with an exclusive museum shop including exclusive items distributed by Slam Jam. The trade show will also be continuing their initiative dedicated to highlighting Korean creative culture in the second step of their Concept Korea project. This will take the form of a runway show by Korean menswear label Beyond Closet, which is spearheaded by designer Tae Yong. “I am very excited to once again be a part of Pitti’s designers line up representing Korea. We will be focusing to show the originality of Beyond Closet plus a new collaboration line that we are currently working on. Stay tuned!” Taye Yong, Beyond Closet. In total the trade show event will include a multitude of 1230 brands from across Europe, Asia, America and India distributed into over 13 sections of the 60,000 m² exhibition space. 

Tags: , ,

Vivienne Westwood x Burberry

09.12.2018 | Blog , Fashion | BY:

Iconic British fashion houses Vivienne Westwood and Burberry recently joined forces in a collaborative collection released this week. The collection is a celebration of British style and heritage and takes inspiration from Vivienne Westwood iconic collections reimagined from a unisex Burberry approach. From double-breasted and hugger jackets to mini kilts, lace up platforms and berets, all is featured in Burberry’s iconic vintage checkered print. The campaign for the collection features a flavourful cast of names like Kate Moss, Sistren, LadyFag , DelaRosa, Vivienne Westwood , Andreas Kronthaler among others, shot in London by David Sims. The designers of the houses were united by a vision to support and promote a UK non-profit organisation called Cool Earth which works alongside rainforest communities. Four exclusive items from the collection will be auctioned off to raise further support for the organisation along with an oversized T-shirt included in the collection with a handwritten message from Vivienne dedicated to the charity. 

Tags: , , , ,

Five Art Works To See In Vienna

30.11.2018 | Art , Blog | BY:

No one needs an excuse to come to Vienna – as the portfolio of talents in the current issue of Twin proves. Vienna Art Week each November grew out of the contemporary art sales at the Dorotheum, the second oldest auction house in the world. It is essentially a celebration of exhibitions and events across the city is chance to see some stunning work – much of which is still on view for the rest of 2018. Here are five highlights of works to see in Vienna right now.

Giorgio Griffa

This painting on raw jute was the highlight of the auctions at the Dorotheum, amongst work by Lucia Fontana, Maria Lassnig and Egon Schiele. The Turin-based abstract painter, who is getting some serious attention in his later years, has helped redefine abstraction with a dose of quantum physics and emphasis on process. See Dorotheum.com

Spitzhaus Mummy in a coffin and other treasures from the Kunsthistoriches Museum

Film director Wes Anderson and his illustrator-art historican partner Juman Malouf have raided all the museums of Vienna to create this delightful cabinet of curiosities grouped together thematically. If you wanted to see what it feels like to walk into a Wes Anderson film, visit here. 

Donna Huanca

Bolivian-American artist Donna Huanca, who works with Berlin’s Peres Projects, has been given carte blanche to fill the classical surroundings of the Belvedere museum with her large scale paintings and performance works, where bodies covered in paint give a much needed injection of life into the history of sculpture and classicism. For more info check out Belvedere.at.

Pieter Breughel

This is the biggest Breughel exhibition you will ever see in your life is also on at the Kunsthistoriches and the work is on another level. One special highlight is this very strange countryside fantasy and sci-fi politics and reinforces how truly incredible the 16the century artist really was. Visit khm for info.

Chadwick Rantanen

Project space Guimares has a brilliant exhibition of small works entitled Schmaltz on until January 19. It includes this very weird and very wonderful twitching pulsating kinetic sculpture made from a hacked battery powered toy by American artist Chadwick Rantanen, alongside works by Thomas Jeppe, Ken Kagami and Urara Tschuiya. Visit here for info. A

Image by Gregor Titze

Tags: , ,

RCA secret postcards

30.11.2018 | Blog | BY:

The annual RCA postcard sale starts today, offering supporters the chance to bid on anonymous postcard-size artworks. Contributing artists this year include Sadie Williams, Celia Hempton, Maggi Hambling, Grayson Perry and Richard Malone, alongside emerging talents from the RCA.

Each donation goes towards supporting the RCA fund, and helps to foster the next generation of artists, designers and illustrators. And you never know, you might end up with a major miniature masterpiece.

Find out more and register here.

Rinse, Repeat.

27.11.2018 | Culture , Fashion | BY:

Richard Malone debuts his first exhibition at NOW Gallery on the Greenwich Peninsula this week. Inside the space Malone, a star of the London womenswear scene, will explore the relationship between fashion, art and movement. Visitors can experience and explore the designer’s processes and inspirations in the tactile installation.

From flicking through Malone’s sketchbooks and listening to transcripts from private appointments, to trying on clothes by the designer, the experience is one that will forge new creative bonds between visitors and the designer. Meanwhile large scale images will help to further immerse visitors inside Malone’s architectural and imaginative world.

Richard Malone’s exhibition ‘Rinse, Repeat’ will be at NOW Gallery for free from 28th November 2018 to 27th February 2019.

Tags:

Miu Miu Women’s Tales 16 – The Wedding Singer’s Daughter

26.11.2018 | Blog , Fashion , Film | BY:

A few years ago in, Italian womenswear label Miu Miu initiated an ongoing series of short films featuring all female directors using the platform to tell captivating and pertinent stories from a female perspective. Each year, the brand commissions and releases two films for both their summer and winter collections. This year, for their 16th installation of the series, the brand has tapped Saudia Arabia’s first female filmmaker Haifaa al-Mansour to direct their freshly-released film entitled “The Wedding Singer’s Daughter.” The film is set during the 1980’s in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia and speaks on the strict gender segregation rules of Saudi Weddings.

The storyline features a cast of women draped in their traditional black abayas driving to the hall of the wedding location, and reveals the sparkle of the glamorous heels, dazzling dresses and wild hair once they arrive and are in an all female presence. As they prepare for this celebration,  all eyes are on the wedding singer to keep it going until the electricity suddenly cuts out. Mumbles begin and guests start to complain, the singer experiences a slight panic until she is saved by an unlikely heroine: her young daughter who manages to save her mother’s dignity. “Weddings are the actual mirror of society in Saudi Arabia: segregated, fragmented, along gender and class. I wanted to tell the story of those people and capture that tenderness,” says the director, “It’s very important for women to tell their stories, and sometimes it’s hard. In the film, the daughter uses her nimble mind to quickly solve the problem just like an independent film-director. For me the little girl represents the future, and the future belongs to the outsiders.” The film can currently be seen along with the brand’s repertoire online MiuMiu.com.

Tags: , , ,

Disrupting patterns with Filippa K

25.11.2018 | Blog , Fashion | BY:

As the ultimate antidote to Black Friday and Cyber Monday consumption, over the weekend Filippa K presented the results of their two year sustainable research project ‘Circular Design Speeds’, in collaboration with Mistra Future fashion, at an exhibition at UAL.

2018 has been the year that fashion finally woke up to its responsibilities. And as fast fashion, and the waste produced by the fashion industry more widely, have come under increasing scrutiny, Swedish brand Filippa K has worked to find a solution.

The results of the project are not only exciting from an environmental perspective, but also in terms of style. Both the 100% recycled and recyclable coat and the  biodegradable dress maintain Filippa K’s classic, timeless aesthetic and high quality, while taking the conversation forward. 

Crucially this new research comes from a major fashion brand rather than an experimental and emerging designer. The learnings and results show that when companies choose to put their resources into sustainable innovation, the results can be truly impactful and redirect the standardised path. 

These first creations, as well as the research process, were shown at the ‘Disrupting  Patterns’ exhibition at the University of Arts in London, alongside a series of talks and lectures aimed at sharing the findings of their projects with the larger fashion community.

In order to transform the linear (thinking) production cycle into a circular system we need understandable and simple examples, role models. Upcycling waste into beautifully naturally dyed dresses is just one of many fruitful ways of doing it – hopefully it will plant a seed to transformation,” explained Marie-Louise Hellgren, Designer at Heart & Earth Production at Filippa K.

As the fashion industry is forced to address the mounting crisis that its practice is contributing to, championing brands that embrace cyclical production is no longer a nicety, but a necessity. 

Tags: ,

Dior: From Paris to the World

21.11.2018 | Art , Blog , Fashion | BY:

This week The Denver Art Museum (DAM) opens its doors to one of it’s most recent exhibitions entitled Dior: From Paris to the World. The exhibition is in celebration of the  legacy of French fashion house Christian Dior and it’s influence on the industry since its inception over 70 years ago. It includes a collection of over 200 haute couture dresses, accessories, photographs, original sketches and runway videos which showcases the visual evolution of the house throughout decades.  The exhibition not only highlights the founding father Christian Dior, but also profiles the work of artistic directors Yves-Saint  Laurent  (1958–1960), Marc  Bohan  (1961–1989), Gianfranco  Ferré (1989–1996),  John Galliano (1997–2011),  Raf  Simons  (2012–2015)  and Maria  Grazia Chiuri  (2016–present). “Dior: From Paris to the World will give our visitors  insight into the  House of Dior’s creative  process and inspirations that contributed to  its  unparalleled impact on the fashion world, which continues to reverberate today,” said  Christoph Heinrich, Frederick and Jan Mayer Director of the DAM.  “This exhibition encourages audiences to think differently about the boundaries of fashion as art, and advance the museum’s commitment to taking viewers behind the scenes to reveal Dior’s imaginative and innovative endeavours.” Curated by Florence Müller, DAM Avenir Foundation Curator of Textile Art and Fashion, the exhibition will be open from Nov 19, to March 3, 2019.

Tags: , , , ,

Lajevardi Foundation: Mimicry — Empathy

20.11.2018 | Art , Blog | BY:

Visual artist Susanne burner recently launched an exhibition at the Lajevardi Foundation at the Karim Khan, Tehran, Iran which explores the topic of the dissolution of self as a gesture of empathy. The exhibit, titled MIMICRY — EMPATHY,  opens visual and oral conversation on the visual adaptations of different life forms in humans and general biology to secure survival.  It touches on the topic of teenagers’ attempts of blending into a prevailing society in different ways to ultimately develop their own identities or soldiers who during wartime opt to make themselves invisible in camouflage gear for obvious reasons. These are forms of mimicry —  an evolved resemblance between an organism and  another object or organism. This process requires a level of empathy from one or both of the parties involved in order to achieve a complete form of similitude by blurring the boundaries between the imitator and model. The Mimicry — Empathy exhibition negotiates these emotionally uncontrollable aspects of adaption and challenges the contract of cultural identities. It showcases a panel of seven artists which includes names such as Bless, Ulla Von Brandenburg, Susanne Burner, Berta Fischer, Sofia Hultén, Annette Kelm and Jochen Lempert. It also includes a screening of films curated by Anne-Sophie Dinant and Amirali Ghasem. The exhibition will run until November 30 and is set to travel to the  Museum of Contemporary Art in Isfahan next year, for more information, check out http://lajevardifoundation.com/

Tags: , ,

Stefano Pilati, Random Identities

19.11.2018 | Blog , Fashion | BY:

A few days ago Italian designer Stefano Pilati debuted a collection under his name with a runway show in Montréal. The collection, and label titled Random Identities, is the designer’s first independent venture since he parted ways with Ermenegildo Zegna in 2016.  A few days prior to the collection’s debut, the designer took to the internet to release a photo series of intimate images shot by photographer Luis Rodriguez. These images featured male bodies shot in black and white wearing nothing but black caps and boots from the collection. This was a series of photographs that at first glimpse on a timeline would instantly capture one’s attention, it felt as if Pilati had something to relevant to say, and this was one’s cue to listen carefully.

The fact that the designer chose to debut in Montreal as opposed to one of the European fashion capitals well within his reach enforced that he was not aiming to continue or tell a story of Yves Saint Laurent, Ermenegildo Zegna, or any of the previous houses he was associated with, but instead, this represented the flip of a blank page for a completely different type of fashion story.

“An honest statement is necessary: fashion at high prices no longer means exclusivity. My response is to produce moderately priced clothes — ‘the low’ — and present them in a high fashion context, creating limited edition items which by quality of design will justify the proposal — ‘the high’.’ The collection was menswear oriented and featured several looks of separates combined and styled to create silhouettes which were genderless. Dominated mainly by shades of black and olive green, the designer describes the pieces as forms of protective wear — constructed from twill and nylon  and offers a presence which is both friendly and secure, providing a feeling of power whether during the day or clubbing at night. Following such a powerful debut of the brand, it will be interesting to see what next he has to offer, as one who seems to have a different voice with an interesting perspective and story to back it.

Tags: , , ,

“The Amount of Love You Have to Give is More Than I Can Stand.”

18.11.2018 | Art , Culture | BY:

Phoebe Collings-James’ first solo show in Cologne opens today. The new exhibition at the Ginerva Gambino gallery presents three wall-size pieces that create an overall frame, with smaller drawings and paintings displayed in between these works.

“In most of Collings-James’ work, violence and beauty coincide.” The gallery says of the new exhibition, noting the complexities and nuances of Collings-James’ work that have seen her reputation skyrocket in recent years. The exhibition addresses dualities and contrasts – “feelings of familiarity and distance. This cacophony relates to her exploration of identity. Her personal (being a queer, British-Jamaican woman) and the historical – the present day and the ancestral.”

Since she graduated from Goldsmiths in London in 2009, Phoebe Collings-James has become one of the most exciting new voices on the scene. Now Brooklyn-based, the artists has had major shows in London, New York and Antwerp. With such a capacity to produce works that make an impression, that are both intense and delicate, it’s easy to see why. The new exhibition is on until the end of January.

Tags:

Sadie Coles HQ: Katja Seib, Dear Diary

15.11.2018 | Art , Blog | BY:

London based contemporary art gallery Sadie Coles HQ introduces their most recent collaboration with German visual artist Katja Seib in an exhibition entitled Dear Diary at their gallery in Mayfair. This is the artist’s first solo exhibition in London which will feature a collection of new paintings which go by the theme of lucid figuration blurs into dreamlike symbolism, sharing a quality of psychological depth in common to her previous work.  On large burlap canvases, Seib depicts characters from real-life models to imaginary personae with materials which permeate both texture and imagery.  The artist’s paintings are often marked by reoccurring symbols and themes such as female sexuality and subjectivity and reality shading ambiguously into fantasy. She explores the use of light and colour using fluctuations in shadow and tones to render spatial depth. Also installed upstairs of the gallery will be an exhibition of her smaller works made on square canvases. This collection is mainly based on photographs she has taken of people she encounters during her life in Los Angeles. The exhibition is set to open on November 16th and will conclude on January 05, 2019. Be sure to stop by and have a look.

Eve’s Curse, Katja Seib (2018)

Tags: , ,

Jane Dickson in Times Square

15.11.2018 | Blog , Literature | BY:

American author Chris Kraus,  culture critic Carlo McCormick and visual artist Fab 5 Freddy have all recently joined forces on the embarkment of a new hardcover creation titled Jane Dickson in Times Square.  The book tells a tale of the artistic, seedy and criminalistic night-time world of Manhattan in the 70’s and early 80’s through the eyes of renowned painter Jane Dickson. As a distinct creative voice of this period, Dickson has made her marks within the legacies of downtown art, punk rock and hip hop through her involvement with the Colab art collective which included her work in iconic exhibitions such as The Real Estate Show (1980) and Times Square Show (1980). Throughout this all,  the artist has lived her success from her apartment of 43rd street while raising two children in a time where the neighbourhood experienced it’s most crime-infested period. Through her journey, the artist has photographed, drawn and painted scenes of life in Times Square. In this book, many of these art works are reproduced for the first time along with candid shots, sketches and paintings.  The book tells the visual tale of a wild, manic, beautiful New York City with a foreword by Chris Kraus, afterword by Fab 5 Freddy and an interview by Carlo McCormick. This is the first first time Dickson has chosen to place her personal speech alongside her finished work as unfiltered personal memories.  “I was a flâneur, documenting this crazy scene: A painter, using the camera to take notes, trying to get some grip on what the hell was going on.. One of my main goals is to leave a record of how the world looked and felt, in this place, at this time, to this woman. The female gaze is not disembodied — it is very much embodied and grounded within the fame form and experience, here in my experience.” The book, published by Anthology Editions, is now on shelves in select stores in the US, UK and Australia, for more information on where and how to purchase, check out the official site. 

Imagery courtesy Jane Dickson In Times Square
Imagery courtesy of Jane Dickson In Times Square

Tags: , , , , ,

The National Museum of Women in The Arts x Rodarte

13.11.2018 | Art , Blog , Fashion | BY:

The National Museum of Women in The Arts (NMWA) in collaboration with American luxury fashion house Rodarte is hosting the museum’s first fashion exhibition at their headquarters in Washington, DC this month. The exhibition which started last weekend, showcases the works of the designer-duo sisters Kate and Laura Mulleavy within the industries of contemporary art and fashion. From an archive of 13 years, composed of nearly 100 looks, each one will be presented as they were on the runway which will highlight selections of the brand’s most pivotal collections. With themes of high fashion and modern femininity, Rodarte has drawn critical acclaim from both the art and fashion worlds since its launch in 2005.  “Rodarte continually prompts a dialogue between the worlds of contemporary art and fashion” says NMWA Director Susan Fisher Sterling.  “This exhibition will continue that discussion with new insights, illustrating the Mulleavy sisters’ highly creative practice and sources of inspiration.”  Early Rodarte collections have made critical acclaim for their use of unconventional material which fused dressmaking and art together with strong influences from Vincent Van Gogh, nature, films etc. “We are honoured to be the first designers to have a fashion exhibition organized by the NMWA,” said the Mulleavy sisters. The exhibition will conclude on February 10, 2019, do ensure to catch a glimpse before it ends.

Rodarte designer-duo sisters Kate (left) and Laura Mulleavy Photo © Clara Balzary
Rodarte, Fall/Winter 2008 backstage; Photo © Autumn de Wilde
Rodarte, Spring/Summer 2018 backstage; Photo © Autumn de Wilde

Tags: , , ,

A-LAB MILANO SS19

12.11.2018 | Blog , Fashion | BY:

Emerging Italian brand A-LAB MILANO, conceived by Milanese designer Alessandro Biasi is a mark which plays on the lexicon of modernity and contemporaneity through the outlet of fashion design. For his Spring/Summer 2019 collection, Biasi cooks up a mixture of his signature 2-D graphic prints combined with Japanese themed iconography and techniques reworked in an innovative manner inspired by street style from the Harajuku district of Tokyo. Varsity jackets, graphic printed t-shirts and oversized raincoats give direct references to contemporary street style while the designer pays homage to the Japanese culture by the use of things such as the Furoshiki — a traditional Japanese cloth, often with a unique pattern used to wrap bento boxes, gifts and other objects for enhanced presentation using knotting techniques. With this technique, Biasi has created a fashion story around the collection of which the protagonist is the art of knotting, used in both functional and decorative ways throughout wrap dresses and blouses. The collection is also accompanied by an accessory line which features fabric Japanese pinstriped bags with leather handles, pouch bags, silk scarves, and shoulder bags.

Tags: , , ,

Join the mailing list

Search

  • Identifying a comfortable and trendy dog cloth is turning out to be difficult, as more and more cute dog clothes are venturing in the global market on regular basis.