Illustrating Fashion with Christina Zimpel

01.04.2019 | Art , Blog , Fashion | BY:

Broad strokes, dense colour, a sense of positive circularity to her work – Christina Zimpel is an artist of a wonderfully bold disposition. Being an Australian in New York City, her work has lifted the pages of Vogue Australia to the SS19 handbags (and set design) of Michael
Kors. There is a natural magnetism to her illustrations, often heavily centred around reinterpretations of the runway or figures of fashion. Christina breaks down familiar catwalk looks into bright colour comparisons of ink and gouache (think green against pink, red beside baby blue), or almost-Surrealistic monochrome, creating confident combinations.
Large almond eyes are bestowed on her interpretations, and for all the magnetism of their form and colour, look out with a gentleness: a reflection of the artist? May Christina Zimpel’s illustrative hand continue: she creates illustrations that lift the page through colour and composition.

What do you do for fun, what’s your favourite colour?

For fun I eat and garden and go for walks. My favourite colour is currently
a mossy green. 

What were you good at in school, what were you not so good at?

I enjoyed history and art and creative writing. I did not pay enough attention to maths and biology.


Who were you favourite bands growing up? Who do you listen to these days?
I like the same bands today as I did growing up… Bowie, Roxy Music, Kraftwerk, Prince, Miles Davis, The Clash, Joy Division etc etc. all really great to work to. And my son Lil Jabba!
 

How did you get into art and illustration?
I got into art by suddenly deciding I wanted to draw – so I drew everything I could see around me every day for a couple of years and shared the results on Instagram. Illustration commissions started coming due to that. In the past it might have been harder to get my foot in the door. However, now I have an audience and some great people saw something interesting in me and gave me work which is wonderful!

Describe a day in your life .
I am quite boring especially in winter when I barely leave the house! I work at home so I am up and working at the kitchen table. I can multi task as the dishwasher and stove are close to my brushes and paints. In the summer I get to go outside and do a bit of gardening or walk around my neighbourhood if I need a break.

Your work appears to be shaped greatly by blocks of colour: does colour or form come first for you when you start a piece?
When I’m painting, colour is an important starting point. I have a definite palette and love to work within those parameters. My colour choices come from distant memories when I became really conscious of my surroundings. The sixties pop colours, the clarity of bright reds and greens and pink my mother loved. They form my landscapes. With illustrations I tend to be influenced by the subject matter be it fashion or narratives. Using very bright colours is tricky so I add banal colours to balance them, otherwise you’d get a headache.

Do you doodle?
I love to doodle! That is something I’ve always done.

You are from Perth yet currently reside in New York: do aspects of either Australia or New York enter your work?
Definitely- Australia is a land of bright clear colours and I like the uplifting feelings it gives me, it ties in with the Fauvist paintings I love so much.
New York really gives me so much love for humanity… so many people all the time all living their lives right in front of you. It really comes out in my work – observations of people’s expressions, body language, the heaviness of life.

Does your mind drift as you draw or does drawing help your mind drift?
I have always been the anxious type. Drawing is the best help I’ve found to drift away from my thoughts and tune out the chatter. It makes me live in the moment.  In the UK, the government is increasingly moving focus away from the arts, leaving a potential massive gap in young people’s education of art.

How important is art to you?
When you are exposed to the arts there is something each person will find interesting or beautiful or earth shattering amongst it. All people should get the opportunity to open up their world and find their own creativity or passions. It shouldn’t be a luxury.


You have worked with the likes of the CFDA, Maison Kitsune and Michael Kors: what role has collaboration played in your career?
I was really lucky to work with some iconic brands in 2018. I had the opportunity to draw portraits, landscapes and create brand identities. I had my first merchandise produced – totes and phone cases and T-shirt’s, as well as beautiful look books and interactive displays. It’s been really exciting and it’s giving me hope that I can grow exponentially, and be collaborative, not just work in a bubble.

What was the last thing that made you excited?
The whole thing- I did not see any of this coming!

Tags: , , ,

“Tim Walker: Wonderful Things” – The Visionary’s Largest Exhibition To Date comes to London

30.03.2019 | Art , Blog , Fashion | BY:

Cover Image: Duckie Thot, Aubrey’s shadow © Tim WalkerStudio

This Autumn London’s largest museum Victoria and Albert is set to host an exhibition on one of fashion’s most celebrated photographers Tim Walker. Titled Tim Walker: Wonderful Things , the exhibition is scheduled to open on September 21st, and will include the largest collection of Walker’s images to date. Curated & designed by leading creative director and Walker’s long-term collaborator Shona Heath , the exhibit will feature 10 new photographic projects which have been directly influenced by the V & A’s vast collection. In preparation for the exhibit, the photographer scoured the museum 145 public galleries, scaled the roof of the 12 acre South Kensington site and explored the labyrinth of Victorian passages below level. Where he encountered , antique jewellery , erotic illustrations, the museum’s largest photograph as well as many other rare artefacts to serve as inspiration for the projects. 

“To me, the V&A has always been a palace of dreams – it’s the most inspiring place in the world. The museum’s collection is so wide and eclectic, and I think that’s why it resonates with me so much. Many of the objects that I saw during my research at the museum made my heart swell and I wanted to try to create a photograph that would relate not only to the physical presence and beauty of that object, but also to my emotional reaction to it. Each new shoot is a love letter to an object from the V&A collection, and an attempt to capture my encounter with the sublime. For me, beauty is everything. I’m interested in breaking down the boundaries that society has created, to enable more varied types of beauty and the wonderful diversity of humanity to be celebrated. Preparing for this exhibition over the past three years has pushed me into new territories, which is very exciting, and I’m at a stage in my life where I feel brave enough to do that,” said the man himself. 

‘Tilda Swinton’, Renishaw Hall, Derbyshire, 2018 (c) Tim Walker Studio

The exhibition will begin with  showcasing over 300 items including short films, photographic sets, props, sketches, scrapbooks and other items from which Walker drew inspiration as well 100 photographs from his previous projects. It will the continue into 10 additional rooms filled with the photographer’s work work inspired by the V & A, his films installations and evocative sets and props alongside the images they inspired.  The exhibition will take it’s bow on March 08, 2020. For more information, visit V & A. 

‘Zo, Kiran Kandola, Firpal, Yusuf, Ravyanshi Mehta, Jeenu Mahadevan, Chawntell Kulkami, Radhika Nair’, Pershore, Worcestershire, 2018 (c) Tim Walker Studio
‘Karen Elson, Sgaire Wood & James Crewe’, London, 2018 (c) Tim Walker Studio

Tags: , , , ,

LVMH Prize Top 8 Finalists

28.03.2019 | Blog , Fashion | BY:

Earlier this year the LVMH Prize announced the top twenty designers selected since it’s worldwide open call for their sixth edition in running. The batch was a diverse group of creatives including London based talents Kiko Kostadinov, Richard Malone and Paria Farzaneh. Kenneth Ize from Nigeria, New York based Caroline Hu among several others who presented their collections last month in Paris at the LVMH HQ for industry insiders. 

Since then, the Prize’s panel of experts including Naomi Campbell, Pat McGrath, Adrian Joffe and Jefferson Hack have narrowed down the list to 8 finalists. The revised list is as follows: 

KENNETH IZE

“At Kenneth Ize we focus on reinterpreting examples of Nigerian craft to create an original perspective on luxury production within textile and fashion. We work with a community of weavers, and also with a variety of artisan and design groups across Nigeria. The label is devoted to the long established traditions of craft and local artisanship, merging a contemporary design aesthetic and new production skills with a specifically local handcraft practice. It is an approach we hope to expand upon to include other design cultures around Africa and abroad. There is the strong belief that in exploring and nurturing existing cultures, one opens up an exciting territory for creating and inspiring future traditions.” 

STEFAN COOKE

The London-based Stefan Cooke brand is directed by Cooke and his partner Jake Burt. The pair are currently working on their Fourth Season, Spring/Summer 20. The combination of Cooke’s subversion of textile techniques and Burt’s skill for silhouette and design underpins the signature style of the pairs’ forthcoming looks. Original techniques and collaboration is at the heart of the process for their work and continues to be a force of innovation.

THEBE MAGUGU

Thebe Magugu is a young designer based in Johannesburg, South Africa. Originally from the small town of Kimberley, he moved to Johannesburg to study fashion design, fashion photography and fashion media from LISOF. After winning best graduate collection, he interned and worked for a selection of designers fashion institutions and retailers. After 2 years, he began his namesake label, THEBE MAGUGU – a South African fashion brand primarily operating within the field of women’s ready to wear.

Speaking about the brand, the designer says, “together with our pillar values of quality, novelty and culture, we constantly seek new ways of presenting women with clothing that both complies with and enhances the everyday. Sleek, forward-looking design intersects with motifs from our continent’s storied past, providing smart, multifaceted clothes as valuable as their woman”.

PHIPPS  – by Spencer Phipps

Spencer Phipps was born and raised in San Francisco. He studied at Parsons School of Design in New York City graduating in 2008 with a nomination as “designer of the year” for his final year collection – an initial exploration of sustainable fashion. He started his career at Marc Jacobs as part of the menswear design team and after, relocated to Antwerp to work with Dries Van Noten as their first American menswear designer. He is currently based in Paris where he pursues his passion for rock climbing and other outdoor activities.

HED MAYNER

The sacred and the traditional are both part of Mayner’s world, as well as a passion for authentic menswear pieces, which he likes to twist and rework. His clothes can be passed on from father to son, escaping the transient nature of designer fashion. Focusing on a substantial and stylish wardrobe of everyday separates, his debut collection emphasizes comfort and self-expression, underlining the universal appeal of archetypal clothes. Addressing the essentials of a male wardrobe -from a sleeveless trench jacket and a pair of loose jeans to a roomy bomber or draped white t-shirt- he roots his sartorial vision within an appreciation of honesty and sincere clothing, as well as an interest in the finer details. Impeccably tailored and constructed, the designer’s clothes are as beautiful inside as they are on the outside, evoking a subtle sense of luxury which must be felt and experienced instead of being seen.

BODE – by Emily Adams Bode

Emily Adams Bode was born and raised in Atlanta, Georgia. After studying in Switzerland, she moved to New York and graduated from Parsons School of Design and Eugene Lang College with a BA/BFA dual-degree in menswear design and philosophy. Bode expresses a sentimentality for the past through the study of personal narratives and historical techniques. Modern workwear silhouettes united with female centric traditions of quilting, mending, and appliqué shape the collections. Each piece of clothing tells a story, and is tailor-made in New York and New Delhi.

BETHANY WILLIAMS

Bethany Williams is a pioneering British menswear designer committed to exploring social and environmental change within her work and working with marginalised parts of society to bring about positive change and social enterprise. At a time in which socio-politics are at the forefront of many designer’s minds, this pioneering designer isn’t just protesting bur rather offering solutions and call-to-actions.  For her collection Women for Change, she has worked closely with female prisoners and the San Patrignano drug dependency program. Bethany Williams, a London-based sustainable fashion designer, focuses our attentions onto women’s rehabilitation for spring/summer 18. For Bethany’s most recent collection she has collaborated with Adelaide House, a women’s shelter based in Liverpool, one of only six such facilities in the country. Adelaide House provides a safe place for women leaving prison with various needs including domestic violence and homelessness. 

ANREALAGE –  by Kunihiko Morinaga

Born in  Kunitachi, Tokyo Kunihiko Morinaga began making clothes in Vantan Design Academy while he was still in Waseda University and launched his own brand “ANREALAGE” in 2003.
ANREALAGE is a combination of the words ”REAL, UNREAL and AGE’’.
The name, ANREALAGE was born from a desire to create real clothes for everyday use while utilizing ultimate dimensions, original concepts, and unique elements. Our collections utilize three key elements. These are “hand craft work”, “conceptual shaping” and “technology” under the mantra of “God is in the details”. In 2005, ANREALAGE won the Design Vision Award For Avant Garde at Gen Art competition for new designer in New York. In 2011, we won the 29th Mainichi Fashion Grand Prix for the best new designer in Tokyo. In 2014, we participated in the Paris Fashion Week, starting with Spring/ Summer 2015. We held “A LIGHT UN LIGHT”, the exhibition with clothes of collections in Paris, in Japan. 

The Prize’s winner , to be decided later this year will receive 300,000 euros and a one-year mentorship program facilitated by the LVMH team. The Prize also acknowledges three young graduates who have completed a course in fashion school by presenting them with an opportunity to join the creative team at one of the houses of the group for a year as well as a 10,000 euro grant.

Tags: ,

Twin Magazine: Infinite Scroll

26.03.2019 | Blog , Fashion | BY:

In a special series of images for Twin, we unpack the idea that perfection is on the surface. In a social media age, nothing is more important than owning your best self on the inside. You know who you are: strong, powerful and empowered. That will never change, but that doesn’t mean you can’t switch it and experiment for kicks – this #betterfacechallenge is served with a wink and a smile. Online is the space to play, take ownership of the fun you can have, all the while knowing that your perfect self is in all your imperfections.

Models Moffy at Storm, Elaine at Nii, Lola at The Squad, Aoi at Tomorrow Is Another Day, Melody at The Hive, Make Up Siddhartha Simone at Julian Watson Agency using CHANEL Vision d’Asie: L’Art du Détail and CHANEL Rouge Coco Flash, Hair Anna Cofone at The Wall Group, Script/Writing Sonya Titus

Tags: , , , ,

Gucci Jewellery ft. Florence Welch -Bohemian Elegance

22.03.2019 | Blog , Fashion | BY:

Earlier this week Italian fashion house Gucci launched it’s new advertising campaign featuring their jewellery ambassador and longtime friend, musician, singer, songwriter, producer Florence Welch. A match made in heaven , Florence is to Gucci as Madonna is to Gaultier or in even simpler terms as bread is to butter. Shot by photographer Colin Dodgson, the campaign features Welch in a retro styled wooden wagon surrounded by a bed of colourful decorative bohemian styled fabrics and furniture as she poses for the camera adorned in the house’s stylised rings, bracelets and necklaces. The artist’s light, nonchalant luxurious mood pairs perfectly with the garments and bijouterie carefully selected from Gucci’s Le Marché des Merveilles, Gucci Ourboros, Gucci Flora and Dionysus fine jewellery collections. Visit Gucci to discover more.

Tags: , , , , ,

“The Coromandel Collection” – Chanel’s Ode to Madame Gabrielle C.

19.03.2019 | Blog , Fashion | BY:

Gabrielle Chanel was said to have been one who lived a figurative lacquered box where sailing ships, palaces, flowers and birds plaited in flashes of gold and deep red stood out against the darkness of light. This fantasy landscape meant so much to her that she often wished to always carry this fantasy in a portable form. This was how her love for Coromandel screens was first discovered in 1910 on a journey with her great love Boy Capel. “The first time I saw a coromandel screen, I cried out: It’s so beautiful! I had never said that about any other object,” said Madame Chanel.

The French fashion house which lives in on in her name recently chose to honour their founder’s passion with a high jewellery collection of fifty-nine pieces inspired by coromandel screens. The collection includes twenty-four pieces which are entirely unique with reworked motifs around the themes of floral, noticeably evoking her signature flower, the Camellia; animal, through the bestiary of Coromandel; and mineral, reflecting her love of crystal and gemstones.

The Fleur De Laque Necklace

The designer was undoubtedly greatly inspired by the intricacies of these Chinese Coromandels which often included art of flora and faunas. She would muse upon the screens and attach photographs and drawings to create a sort of moodboard  or theatre in which she would often immerse herself. “When I look at this screen in the evening for example,”she continued, “ I see doors opening and knights setting off on a horseback.”

At the heart of this animal theme, the workshop captures a flock of in flight birds as they appear on some of the designer’s screens in an ornament diamond right that boasts over ten carats. The collection’s gems also calls on the colours of the Coromandel lacquers which includes the greens of the Tsavorite garnet, emeralds and the over thirty-seven carat tourmaline on the “Vibration Minérale” ring; the red spinel on the “Evocation Florale” ring and the ruby beads and deep hypnotic black lacquer transposed onto the onyx. To shop or view the full collection visit CHANEL


The Évocation Florale necklace
Coco Chanel (1883-1971), couturière française. Paris, 1937.

Tags: , , , , ,

Balenciaga’s Futuristic London Store Opening

15.03.2019 | Blog , Fashion | BY:

Yesterday Spanish luxury fashion house Balenciaga opened it’s doors in London to a new two story ready-to-wear and accessory store on Sloane Street. The store’s interior design is an exploration of Creative Director Demna Gvasalia’s interest in the look and feel around the idea of diverse retail environments.  The store features a large display case along with a combination of ceiling panel lamps and floor to ceiling with on the ground floor. With a very futuristic feel, it includes grey scaled industrial furniture and columns, aqua green carpets, and glass and metals shelves complemented by minimal wrapped seating. The storefront also introduces a pair of hyper realistic mannequins based on two exclusive models: Eliza Douglas and Takato Harashima.   

Tags: , , ,

Q & A with Millennial Milliner Emma Brewin

04.03.2019 | Blog , Fashion | BY:

Within the past few months you’ve probably noticed that faux fur hats and garments have been trending, from the streets of London, Milan and Paris Fashion weeks, to magazine editorials and cover shoots. Upon further inspection, you’ll probably find out that a great number of these pieces were made by British millennial milliner Emma Brewin. Her clientele has been from the likes of Rita Ora, Miley Cyrus, Adwoa Aboah to Kylie Jenner for Paper Magazine, Vogue USA among others. Brewin has been stitching faux fur outerwear and accessories for these pop culture behemoths from the comfort of her hometown Sandwich in South East England. 

“I really enjoy being out here in the middle of nowhere and doing my own thing,” she says. Twin sat down with the designer for a chat about struggles, inspiration, and the creative direction behind her latest SS19 Campaign shot by photographer Chloe Sheppard.

When and how did you learn to make hats? 

I studied fashion design at university but I suppose I am self-taught in millinery. I made my first hat back in 2013, to match a coat I had made, and now I can’t make a coat without a furry topper! 

What persuaded you to go in the direction of faux fur as opposed to any other fabric?

At university I did lots of studies into what fabrics children find most appealing when dressing up, and fur was a always up there with the first things they grabbed, once I started working with it I completely fell in love, for me it can complete any outfit and make it so much more special.

How long does it take you to make each piece?

It completely depends on the piece but if I am working on a hat I always give myself a full day from start to brushing and boxing up.

What was the direction behind your SS19 campaign and collection? 

When starting a collection I never really have any particular direction, it’s my favourite part of the whole process, the girls and I just make, make and make. Usually producing pieces that we would dream of finding in old vintage shops then playing around with them until they are perfect. The studio is like a fancy dress box of hats, and the ones we dress up in the most are usually the ones we put into production. In regards to the campaign we really wanted to let the hats speak for themselves, which is why (for the first time) we shot in a studio. 

Where, what or who do you look to for inspiration? 

Everything old. 

What has been your greatest challenge since the launch of the label? 

Relinquishing control and not doing every job myself.

Who is the ideal Emma Brewin woman?

Our customers. We really do have the best customers on Earth. 

What’s next for you? 

We have spent January and February locked in the studio making some wonderful new styles, we released a sneak peek of our new Cat Hat on Instagram the other day, and have some matching new accessories to twin with our hats coming very soon.. 

Photographry- Chloe Sheppard

Styling – Clarissa Bowman

Hair – Sinead Gregory

Make up – Lindsay Low

Model – Mimi (Anti agency)

Tags: , , ,

The Art of Women Exhibition

03.03.2019 | Art , Blog | BY:

This week, British organization The Art of Women launches their exhibition in support of women across the United Nation. The Art of Women is a solidarity movement for the empowerment of women which unites UN Women with fashion models in an effort to amplify their voices. The organization is a commitment to human rights and is a form of advocacy for respect towards women and  diversity by promoting change through art and raising awareness around issue surrounding feminism . The Art of Women opens the doors of their exhibition tomorrow March, 4th through 6th at the Florence Loewy in Paris. The exhibition shot by Nikki Esser, provides a perspective on a diverse representation of women, authenticity and empowerment as the photographer captures the personalities of her muses through her warmth and the connections she creates with them. For further information visit The Art of Women.

Tags: , , ,

Homage To Karl Lagerfeld: 30 Years of Photography at Galerie Gmurzynska

26.02.2019 | Art , Blog , Fashion | BY:

Swiss art gallery Galerie Gmurzynska has recently opened it’s door to an exhibition in honour of the artwork of the late Karl Lagerfeld. Many might not have  known that one of the iconic designer’s talents were photography but over the decades Galerie Gmurzynska has worked with Lagerfeld on numerous shows, publications and projects. The gallery is also said to be the very first to put his photography on display. 

“We wanted to honour this long collaboration and this man whom we regarded as one of the last true renaissance genius. We were all incredibly saddened by his passing and spontaneously wanted to show our respect for Karl by remembering our two decades of collaboration, showing a wider public his lesser known passion for photography,” said co-owners Mathias Rastorfer and Krystna Gmurzynska. The exhibition features nearly 50 pieces of Lagerfeld’s work which has been curated  Rastorfer in a way to take it’s audience on a comprehensive journey throughout his body of work.  The exhibition will conclude on May 15th. Visit the gallery’s website for more information.

Cover image: Benicio Del Toro (Hollywood Stars) 2002

Nicole Kidman (1995) by Karl Lagerfeld
Gone with the Wind (1996) by Karl Lagerfeld
Series BodyParts (1998) by Karl Lagerfeld

Tags: , , ,

MFW: GCDS’ FW19 Troubled Youth

24.02.2019 | Blog , Fashion | BY:

Weekend past Italian streetwear label GCDS presented their Fall Winter 2019 collection in their signature show space in Milan. This season , creative director Giuliano Calza’s inspiration for the collection was a play on the notion of how society’s boundaries and expectations for today’s youth represents a toxin of creativity and imagination. Though quite simple inspiration, the designer wrapped his mind around a rather complicated show concept. The first half of the 49 look collection revealed a cast of models bouncing down the runway in 90’s inspired looks which included cheetah and zebra prints, bouncy pink hair, logo printed coats and lots of vibrant colours. It also revealed the house’s collaboration with pasta company Barilla and toy company Polly Pocket which carried their logos across sweaters. The second half of the collection was when the magic apparently vanished from the youth as a result of having to succumb to social norms and standards. This revealed a cast of models dressed in veils, catsuits, mini dresses, work suits in a palette of black, purple, blue and other dark shades.  This was a simple yet interesting statement made with a simple change of lighting and music. Giuliano Calza often delivers a show which gives you all the fun,  but at the same time never borderlines on costume. He creates these concepts for his consumers which not only makes them want to purchase pieces but also makes them want to join in the story. He creates a narrative which is very much street, and although some may argue at times he may border on cultural appropriation , has not yet crossed the line, especially as a result of his selection of such a diverse casting. This makes you wonder, if by doing so, he’s in some ways subconsciously aiming to challenge the walls down around the concept of appropriation itself.

Cover image: Scott Mason

Tags: , , , ,

MFW: Marni’s Neuroerotik FW19

24.02.2019 | Blog , Fashion | BY:

This weekend Italian fashion house Marni’s Fall Winter womenswear show took place in the same location as the menswear show only a few weeks ago. Guests were welcomed into the space of dim multi-coloured lighting and speakers as they eagerly waited for the show titled “NEUROEROTIK” to commence. As the name suggests, creative director Francesco Risso envisioned the show to be a fantaerotic escape game. A game based on the themes of sexuality, sensuality and mind play. It was about exploring the possibilities of re-directing the mind to think of alternative body parts and even garments as erogenous zones. As the electric soundtrack from the movie The Shining was cued, each piece from the collection walked with a double meaning, gold and silvers chains wrapped around the neck and body, silk pleated scarves which hung from the neck and almost dropped to the floor, skirts with two waistlines, mens blazers and jackets cut in half, and sleeves were slashed. It was a quirky humour sort  which made one marvel at the possibilities of sexuality, the power of the mind and the concept of fashion design as a means of neurotic exploration. Each piece told a story and gave a stimulus to a different conceptualization of what we know as reality with a primary palette of red, black, orange,  white and hints of rhinestones. This woman Risso created around the themes of sexual liberation and experimentation fruited a line of wardrobe components that is in many ways reflective of the feminist zeitgeist we are currently living in. 

Cover image: Scott Mason

Tags: , , ,

MFW: Fendi’s Farewell FW19

22.02.2019 | Blog , Fashion | BY:

Just yesterday, Roman fashion house Fendi invited guests to their Milan location to view the final collection designed by the late Karl Lagerfeld. There was something to be said about the atmosphere upon location, the screams of the fur protesters on the outside in comparison to the somber mood on the inside, it was an aspect that was very Karl Lagerfeld. How regardless of protests, laws or whatever was happening, the iconic designer had a code which he lived by and carried to his grave, which is something to be respected. 

Of course, the Fendi Fall Winter 2019 collection was an ode to Karl and his half a century with the house. As an apt sound track of Lou Reed & John Cale’s Small Town played in the background, it set the mood for what was to come, a compilation of Lagerfeld’s signature designs throughout time. Starting from the beginning with his classic silhouettes, the first look made it’s debut as a double breasted suit dress with a poignant white bow around the neck. Throughout the collection , the looks featured a various number of different styles and tailoring, the iconic Fendi logo monogram , designed by Karl himself in his ‘Karliagraphy’ font appeared on coats and cabochon buttons there were also floating bow belts, pleated trouser, asymmetric lapels, tulle bodysuits , pointed collars and laser cut leather outwear. Neutral tones of ivory tulle, cognac and beige contrasted shades of sea green, yellow, tangerine and azure. Each piece holding the common thread of the late designer’s expertise. The iconic Fendi Baguette was also transformed into versions of embossed pillow patent, vegetal leather and a multi-strap utility harness. The entire collection was a celebration of Mr. Lagerfeld as a designer whose inception created a whole new era of designers and whose vision helped to shape the Italian house into the brand that it is today. “The bond between Karl Lagerfeld and Fendi is fashion’s longest love story, one that will continue to touch our lives for years to come. When we called just a few days before the show, his only thoughts were richness and beauty of the collection,” to quote Silvia Venturini. 

Tags: , , , , ,

MFW: Prada FW19 – Anatomy Of Romance

22.02.2019 | Blog , Fashion | BY:

Yesterday Italian fashion house Prada welcomed guests to their show space in Milan, for the viewing of their Fall Winter 2019 Women’s collection. Being the same set to that of the menswear show last month , this show was a continuation of the Frankenstein storyline established in the previous show, from a slightly different perspective. Last season designer Miuccia Prada’s focus was on the outcasts of society, she crafted a collection mainly inspired by the social Frankensteins of society, which was a dark but interesting stimulus. However this season, she decided to shed light on the more affectionate side of such a love story , being love stories like Frankenstein and his Bride. The collection titled “The Anatomy of Romance,” was an exploration of the gloom of love and romance and their duality. It spoke to that turbulent pull one has towards love even when you know it will end in turmoil. As a violin instrumental of bad romance plays in the background, a model struts the runway in a full black gown with an embroidered yellow rose to the side. This was the mood, this was a woman who was strong, feminine, who falls in love and gets her heart broken every time, yet always gets back up to try again. The collection also featured a military utilitarian nod: army green skirts, massive patch pockets, black trouser suits, along with fun features such as lace veils and skirts, a Frankenstein + Bride printed dress, mohair fur ear and head muffs  and also mohair fur backpacks. As much as this collection focused on the dark side of things, it also focused on love’s duality and it’s potential to bloom, with flashes of flower prints and embroideries throughout the story. Last season Ms.Prada had lots of fun with a quirky, interesting collection, however this season, the pieces were more practical and serious and also very Prada. 

Cover Image: Scott Mason

Tags: , , , ,

MFW: Arthur Arbesser FW19

21.02.2019 | Blog , Fashion | BY:

In past seasons, Austrian designer Arthur Arbesser often referenced art from the Viennese Secession for inspiration behind his collections. However, the only valid explanation for the designer’s dexterity in design and architecture intricately executed in his last collection is for him to hold himself to the same standards as one of these artisans. 

For Fall Winter 2019, the designer welcomed guests to an indoor sound-reflective rock climbing site on the outskirts of Milan . As the show began,  the space was first filled with an arrangement of elegant orchestral music complemented by the clank of approaching rubber boots. Calf high rubber boots fashioned in black, white and blue carefully paired with a selection of colours from Arthur’s palette. The collection took inspiration from the architectural context of his Milan studio which was designed by Luigi Caccia Dominoni in the late forties with a bourgeois classic Milanese aesthetic. Each look was skilfully paired with the most unexpected complementary colours: pomegranate and lychee shade pants, yellow and olive, checkered shirts and skirts,  feather textured blouses, architectural jewellery. This collection felt very personal to the designer, as if the woman he was dressing would be a woman he would not only be dressing, but be crafting, and grooming. She felt free, artistic and at the same time cryptic, almost like the a female Picasso who took you on a very personal journey throughout her abstract process, but instead of paint, her chosen medium is fabric. 

Cover image: Scott Mason

Tags: , , ,

Fashion East Fall-Winter 2019

19.02.2019 | Blog , Fashion | BY:

Last weekend passed this year’s first Fashion East showcase which featured a list of three intriguing London based emerging designers, in showcase of their Fall Winter 2019 Collections. The non-profit initiative, set up by Lulu Kennedy and Old Truman Brewery to support and nurture emerging British talent celebrates its 18th year of triumph after housing designers such as JW Anderson, Kim Jones and Gareth Pugh; just to name a few.

Central Saint Martins graduate Gareth Wrighton was one of the three talents to showcase. Wrighton presented a 22 look collection in collaboration with stylist Ib Kamara titled “Smooth Criminal.” The collection was inspired by a four month residency the designer previously took in Johannesburg with Kamara and South African photographer Kristin Lee Moolman. It cohesively spoke to the stories of political coups, warring dynasties and feuding families caught in a violent power struggle. The looks included flaming hair, bullet accessorised mini dresses and sweaters with burning forests. The collection in itself was nothing short of a political statement. 

Gareth Wrighton AW19 | Image via Chris Yates
Gareth Wrighton AW19 | Image via Chris Yates

In 2017 Designer Charlotte Knowles and partner Alexandre Arsenault launched their South London label Charlotte Knowles London after also completing their masters at Central Saint Martins. Designing for a feminine and strong woman, in the AW19 collection, Knowles explores femininity and ready to wear in a way which disrupts traditional boundaries. Boundaries between the vulnerable and the combative, the human and the natural, the intimate and the public and the strange and familiar. The collection featured wool and technically crafted fabrics, made in soft pastel colours from form fitting, to minimal to fluid.  This was the designers’ final showcase with the support of the Fashion East Initiative .

Charlotte Knowles AW19 | Image via Chris Yates
Charlotte Knowles AW19 | Image via Chris Yates
Charlotte Knowles AW19 | Image via Chris Yates

The final collection was that of Chinese CSM trained designer Yuhan Wang whose collection was inspired by traditional Chinese concepts of femininity and their connections to western culture. She explored the lines between beauty and strangeness , softness, delicacy and sensibility. In her second season showcasing for the Fashion East initiative, Wang’s pieces were made in silk satins, lace, velvet and tulle in ripple technique to flounce around the female form. She presented sheath and tea dresses in a 3 Dimensional way where her ruches and other artistically danced around the body. “ I think of it as the push and pull we experience as women. The constant dialogue between our inner and outer worlds,” says wang.  With soft colours of blue, lilac and primrose yellow, the designer pieced together a cohesive collection which told an impactful and interesting story. 

Yuhan Wang AW19 | Image via Chris Yates
Yuhan Wang AW19 | Image via Chris Yates
Yuhan Wang AW19 | Image via Chris Yates

Tags: , , , ,

Upcycling fabric, unravelling memories: Renata Brenha

15.02.2019 | Blog , Fashion | BY:

“Today we are so surrounded by waste. For me I really like when the material has a story. It is like animating something that is currently inanimate: if you put it in a new context it always has this spirit! Especially for our times, we have so much waste and we need to do something about it.”

Renata Brenha is a designer of precision and feeling. Her debut collection, showcasing at London Fashion Week, puts to work this meticulous and formulated explorations of her Latin American heritage, her fascination with Mexico and a pre-occupation with material and its consumption.

Her clothes attempt to catch a spirit, an attitude, of the communities she explores: utilising the silhouette and work with cloth to translate these nuances. There is always a translation – its important the way I work with fabric: pleating, painting, reimagining – but I always want to capture that spirit. 

I love performance, and clothes have that ritualistic space. You are in that moment, you are that person. 

Each item of her 16 look collection holds an anecdote – I like to feel them as individuals! – which is retold through their cut. The tales range from the Grandma dress, made with studio scraps from the pattern of a dress her grandmother decreed as perfect; the coat-trouser coagulation – there is a Mexican saying “a courageous woman is someone who knows how to wear her trousers”; to her tights top, a reworked version of the improvised thermals her mother created to keep Renata warm in the winter months of her hometown just outside Sao Paolo. 

Workwear is weaved throughout the collection – when you travel to Mexico to see communities you see workwear half-references through their natural dress. Traditional clothing with something intuitive about putting things together. I love canvas, it’s something that really tells the passage of time. There is always a story behind it: when you put it behind a female body the story changes that I find so interesting too. 

While saved for the presentation itself, headdresses are to be made by a gardener, Luciano. Initially Renata wanted the headdresses to be more dangerous, more testing (initially thinking of cactus) but after looking at images by Claudia Andujar, and the ritualistic energy from her feather headdresses, Luciano felt he could create something similar with moss. 

The moss comes together with braids in the hair intertwining, much like the fabric, cuts and reference points.

Renata’s heavy referencing of Mexico came about from the desire to visit a place that she could relate to through the Spanish language, but also look from a distance. Mexico felt like home but also really fresh – a little bit of space but still a connection. She found a lot of affinities with her own home of Latin America: both holding relationships with mysticism and improvisation. 

A colour palette deeply entrenched in blacks, whites and blues give clarity and corners to her garments: the smocking, the hand painting, the deliberate reworking. While her shapes are anthropomorphic, and her vision is cut from a refreshing cloth, Renata has just begun her brand – here’s to her future fables of fabric.

Tags: , , ,

Bottega Veneta Spring Summer 2019 Campaign

14.02.2019 | Blog , Fashion | BY:

Earlier this month Italian fashion house Bottega Veneta released fresh new images for their Spring Summer 2019 campaign. Marking the first campaign for the brand under the new creative direction of Daniel Lee.

The designer was appointed in June, which allowed him means he missed the opportunity for the design process of the SS19 collection but was still able to edit it. However the creative direction of the campaign was solely led by his vision. The previous Céline designer teamed up with photographer Tyrone LeBon to present a selection of images influenced by minimalism and Italian coasts. Shot on the Neapolitan island of Ischia, the images are said to strip fashion and art down to their purest forms in a way which highlights and appreciates their similarities. A black trench coat, woven leather, knit, squared toed pumps. The campaign was a sort of visual documentary on the relationship between skin and material. This peek of the designer’s taste and appreciation for beauty is just enough to gather him an audience of eager new consumers leading up to his debut show later this month, especially during this time when old Céline consumers are scouting elsewhere. 

Tags: , , , ,

Fendi’s “One and Only Baguette” ft. Carrie Bradshaw

05.02.2019 | Blog , Fashion | BY:

For the final installation of Fendi’s #BaguetteFriendsForever series, the Italian fashion house released a short film shot along the busy streets of the big apple titled “The One and Only Baguette.” The movie, features  influencers Caro Daur and Natasha Lau along with models Ebonee Davis and Melissa Martinez. During a lunch break, Daur relives the moment she saw a unique vintage purple sequinned Baguette at the Fendi store and decides she just will not live without it. On a hunt for the baguette, the girl group hurries back to the store where they discover that the piece was just sold. Still determined to cop the  accessory , the girls run out into the busy streets of New York to find this mystery woman. During their search they spot the baguette and when she turns around they notice it’s not just a woman, but an icon, Sarah Jessica Parker, who finishes the film with a sassy,  “This isn’t a bag, it’s a baguette.” 

Last week the brand launched the campaign #BaguetteFriendsForever which includesd a series of short films featuring the storylines of inseparable groups of friends around the world throughout one of their daily routines which is centered around the iconic Fendi baguette. The first episode was titled “The Baguette is Back” and was an adventure set in the streets of Shanghai China. The second episode Titled “The Missing Baguette,” was shot in Hong Kong and this marks the final leg off the Baguette series. All pieces are currently available in stores worldwide and online, to shop the looks , visit Fendi.

Tags: , , ,

Twin Magazine presents “Twin X” : Jan 31 – Feb 02

04.02.2019 | Art , Blog , Fashion | BY:

This week Twin Magazine opens our doors in London to a group exhibition  entitled “Twin X” which celebrates a decade of local emerging talent and creativity.  The showcase, which opens on January 31st at The Store X in East London, pulls on the visual archive of our biannual print publication featuring the works of several creatives throughout the industries of fashion, photography and art. Collectively curated by Twin Founder Becky Smith; Twin art editor and curator Francesca Gavin; curator and gallerist Antonia Marsh; image director Holly Hay and Twin fashion editor Naomi Miller, the exhibition is an amalgamation of the personal taste and perspective of each curator. 

It is a display which collectively showcases specially-commissioned editorial images that focus on independence and individualism, which are themes that have been carried throughout the magazine since it’s conception in 2009. 

“As publications have come under increased pressure to compromise over the last decade, Twin has remained a distinct and independent platform for pure creativity. The show celebrates the artists that have helped shaped and define independent publishing as it stands today, ” says Founder Becky Smith.

With work from photographers such as Stef Mitchell, Cass Bird, Boo George, Bibi Cornejo Borthwick, Dexter Navy and Akinola Davies Jr, the show deconstructs a central narrative into four sections: Photographers, Models, People and the Unseen. Exploring the thoughts behind these characters, faces and creatives who are defining the nature of contemporary creativity. The Unseen section of the exhibition will also feature never-before-seen outtake shots from the magazine’s photographic archive, providing spectators with a rare insight into the world of image-making and its process. Twin X features free admission and concludes on February 3, 2019. 


Photograph by Yaniv Edry, Issue 19, 2018.

Photograph by Akinola Davies Jr., Issue 19, 2018.

Tags: , , , , ,

Join the mailing list

Search

  • Identifying a comfortable and trendy dog cloth is turning out to be difficult, as more and more cute dog clothes are venturing in the global market on regular basis.