Portraits of Intimacy: An Interview with photographer Olivia Bee

01.02.2017 | Art , Blog | BY:

Olivia Bee started taking pictures in her early teens, one of those rare precocious talents who already had the basics nailed before most of us had figured out how to make our lava lamps work. And when I say basics, I mean being commissioned to shoot commercials for Nike and Converse by the time she was 17.

Having emerged during the peak Tumblr years, Bee has continued to carve a name for herself with candid photographs that capture the intensity of youth; the fragile nexus of love, and the yearning for the wild. Her photographs are often situated within nature, away from the obvious limitations of the city and the responsibilities that lie therein.

With a knack for powerful juxtapositions, Olivia Bee’s photographs have a corpuscular quality that capture individual moments in time but which together weave a wider narrative about the transient nature of youth. With a beautiful new tome, Kids in Love, out now, Twin caught up with her to talk hanging out in Oregon and the future of the Internet.

 

Starting with Kids in Love – your photographs embody a fantastic energy. What’s your process when shooting?

Kids In Love came about because I was taking pictures of the world around me — I wasn’t really trying to make anything in particular, other than the things I gravitated towards. When it was finished, I knew, and I knew it was a show and a book. The energy in Kids In Love came from the universe that I existed in and made for myself when I was a teenager. I was observing that universe.

What was it about the camera that you were originally drawn to?

The ability to create and make art simultaneously; to directly document your experience.

What I like about Kids In Love is that you immortalise the transient state of youth through movement and these wonderful juxtapositions with the natural world. Was this an aesthetic that came naturally to you? How did your style develop?

I mean this just came with living in Oregon, living in nature but being around kids my age and exploring that universe. In Oregon you just go to the river and to the mountain and to the beach and to the forest, that’s what you do for fun and that’s where you get drunk. it was just part of every day. Green was my studio.

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You started working professionally when you were pretty young, did you ever feel that this inhibited your ability to develop creatively? Was there less freedom to make mistakes, experiment etc.

I always kind of did what I wanted and didn’t think much about it. There were times I’d get feedback from people who were selling my work saying what i was doing was less marketable, but i’d just be like, “dude. i’m just documenting my world.” It was (and is) a natural process for me to document. I still experimented and made plenty of bad pictures.

What is it about intimacy that interests you as a subject matter?

It is so innately human.

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Instagram has bought this generation a whole host of really exciting creatives who otherwise might not have had the capacity to promote their work to a global audience, but do you ever feel that sheer scale of the platform – and its millions of contributors – might come to negate the power of a singular image?

I’m getting less and less satisfied with the internet. It’s all controlled by money at this point and our information is getting sold so that companies can market for our demographics. It’s terrifying. We have to fight back and play that game to our advantage. My work belongs in galleries and in books and in theaters — not just the internet. I get depressed when my pictures I love are just on the internet and then they’re gone or stolen because people think the internet is an equal playing field and ownership is lost.

Also with the internet, people skip over movies, books, tv shows, people, and minimize them into one single image on their tumblr when they haven’t seen that movie, tv show, read that book, or researched that celebrity. Everything is aestheticized. Even the notion of “liking” or “loving” something or someone has been aestheticized. Authenticity has been aestheticized. People have to remember what’s real and I really do think a big part of that is existing in your world and participating and reading and talking to people and watching movies in the theater and on tv and going to museums and being in nature if these kinds of things are available to you. That shit will keep you human.

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Who and what are the major influences for your work?

My life and my emotional experiences. The wonderful people i surround myself with. Nature.

What do like to listen to when working?

Right now I’ve been listening to a fuck ton of Leonard Cohen. I just discovered Emily Eeo when I was in a coffee shop in Portland and have been playing that over and over. The Lemon Twigs are wonderful too.

What’s your favourite camera to work with?

That’s a secret 😉

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What’re your plans, concerns and hopes for 2017?

Time is a marker that we created — it doesn’t actually exist. It’s fluid. So I don’t always believe in setting goals for certain periods of time but I do feel that with 2017 and the upcoming Trump presidency it is especially important to stand up for the things you believe in. I want the people I choose to be in my work, especially in fashion, to be more diverse, and I want to write a book? Or a movie? I want to quit low balling and I want to stand up for myself and the ones I love more! Also establish some sort of place to live in the future in nature.

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Smashing The Glass lens: Photo Vogue Celebrates The Next Generation

24.11.2016 | Art , Blog , Fashion | BY:

The inaugural Photo Vogue Festival is celebrating the next generation of talented female fashion photographers, those who have subverted the traditional power male / female dynamic and liberated women from prescribed identities – the madonna, the whore.

Over three exhibitions in Milan, the female body is celebrated and examined in mysterious, alluring and mystical images from names such as Vanessa Beecroft, Petra Collins and Cindy Sherman. Beecroft’s work is exhibited in a stand-alone show that includes work from 1993 – 2016. In ‘The Female Gaze’ a host of dynamic artists are displayed together, creating a powerful rallying cry to a new era of fashion photography that empowers and enables women on both sides of the lens. The third exhibition, PhotoVogue/inFashion showcases the new talent who were brought together as part of the Photo Vogue competition. Conceived and curated by Vogue Italia, the festival also incorporates talks and lectures.

Juno Calypso

Donna Trope Blow up

© Yelena Yemchuk

Photo Vogue Festival takes place in Milan, Italy, on November 22-26.

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Petra Tate

Petra Collins x Tate Modern

19.07.2016 | Art | BY:

To mark the opening of the Tate Modern’s long-anticipated Georgia O’Keeffe retrospective, acclaimed artist and leading voice among the ‘new-wave feminists’ – Petra Collins – has created a specially commissioned video at the request of the gallery.

Taking inspiration from some of the ‘Mother of American Modernism’s’ most famous works – spanning her almost 100 year life – Collins’ video is a mesmerising exploration of every aspect of modern femininity, much in the way that O’Keeffe did so iconically before her.

“O’Keeffe was one of the first artists that made me appreciate color in a whole new way. Her use of it makes me feel like her landscapes are complex beings. That with each stroke of color, each line, each curve, she’s bringing these locations to life. With this short I wanted each girl to really play with their surroundings (that were inspired by O’Keeffe’s desert and Lake George – her two favourite spots) – to use their every inch of skin, muscle, bone, etc and really put themselves into her landscape too – while making their own.” – Petra Collins

New York-based Collins’ video features a bevy of relevant and revolutionary women, from Barbie Ferreira to Maia Ruth Lee, Seashell Coker and Ajani Russell. With fans including Katy Perry, Lena Dunham, Selena Gomez and Marilyn Minter, she has been heralded as the ‘next defining artist of her generation.’

Georgia O’Keeffe at the Tate Modern runs until 30th October 2016, click HERE for tickets.

Petracollins.com

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Petra Collins: Babe

27.04.2015 | Art , Culture | BY:

Young Canadian photographer and Twin contributor Petra Collins is known for her girl power images that prove feminism and sexuality aren’t mutually exclusive. In a new book, Babe, Collins, as well as 30 artists who have been part of her online collective The Ardorous, explore the female identity through aesthetically varied bodies of work.

Collins’s friend and collaborator, Tavi Gevinson, well-known for her online magazine Rookie, introduces Babe with a foreword that explains just how pivotal Collins’ work has been, not just to Gevinson, but to young woman around the world.

This inspiring collection of work, from artists hailing from New York, London, Moscow, Stockholm, Los Angeles, Berlin and Toronto, reflects a distinctly female point of view for a new generation of creative, forward-thinking women.

Babe is released on May 1st. Pre-order here

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Twin Issue XI

17.11.2014 | Blog , Twin Book | BY:

Twin’s 11th edition is a celebration of creative brilliance. We begin with photographer Petra Collins who shares an exclusive image diary revealing the riotous beauty of adolescence. Elsewhere, model Eliza Cummings hits the highway in an epic road story shot by Scott Trindle. We debate with the philosopher and essayist Susan Neiman as she makes a case for embracing growing up. While musician Eliot Sumner tells us what it means to step back into the spotlight after a four-year hiatus. There’s insight into another enigmatic performer, Kate Bush, via a collection of childhood photographs by her big brother, John Carder Bush. To complete the musical triumvirate, the inimitable Neneh Cherry reflects on music and motherhood; while her daughters offer their own unique take on life in the Cherry clan.

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