More Than A Muse opens in NYC

09.09.2016 | Art | BY:

This weekend, during New York Fashion Week, sees the opening of the ‘More Than A Muse’ exhibition, which features the work of Larry Clark, Sandy Kim, Ryan McGinley and Dash Snow, and is curated by Aiden Tuite.

Seeking to explore “those relationships between artist and subject that exceed creative companionship and are based on inextricable, emotional ties”, the exhibition is as raw and visceral as it is complex. Pushing past the usual constraints of mere beauty or staging, the works feature parents, lovers, siblings and friends, and offer an unfiltered insight in the relationship that exists between the capturer, and the captured – on both sides of the lens.

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Colby Hewitt by Sandy Kim

In this show, it is both the photographer and the muse who are to be recognised as artists. It is a symbiotic display that proves that in order to convey something with genuine feeling, both parties have to be fully alive and present in the moment. Do not miss it.

‘More Than A Muse’ runs from 11th-18th September, at 65 Ludlow St, New York. Email [email protected] for further info.

Main image: Christophe de Menil by Dash Snow

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One To Watch: Stefanie Biggel

02.03.2016 | Fashion | BY:

For those perpetually in search of a little sartorial freshness, Stefanie Biggel is a designer to watch. The 31-year-old, who originally hails from Zurich, spent a year in London before deciding to live and work in Athens, and is in the midst of building a successful brand built on desirable separates that are imbued with the fluidity of youth, gender and contrasting mediums. In essence, it’s the perfect collection for ‘generation Y’ – with references spanning Kurt Cobain and Larry Clark films to political correctness and superstar celebrity; the latter a jumping board for her latest collection, ‘Hysteria’.

Here, we speak to Stefanie and showcase some exclusive, never-before-seen images of her creative process for the new season.

You trained in Basel, Switzerland – how was that? What kind of cultural stimulation does it offer?
The education at my university was really good. Also in terms of handcraft. This was always very important to me. That’s why I still make all the samples myself. It’s part oft he design process for me. On the other hand the town was very small and I wanted to leave at a certain point and move on. I can’t be in the same place for too long. This has changed a bit since last year. It was really good for me to move to Greece and slow down a bit.

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Stefanie Biggel

How long did it take you define your own aesthetic? Or is it still evolving?
I feel like it’s constantly evolving in a way. It suits my personality. But after seven collections and reaching a certain age I can express myself a lot better and speak out what I don’t like. I’m more relaxed. When you’re insecure people from the industry always try to push you in a certain corner, try to form you. I know about my insecurities and they belong to me and my work. It’s okay to not be perfect.

Descriptions of your work often include the word ‘boxy’ – what is it about this silhouette that appeals to you?
‘Boxy’ ist just one of many silhouettes. They all interest me. One day I feel like wearing a unisex look, the other day I wanna show my body. It depends on the mood and can change constantly.

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An exclusive preview from the ‘Hysteria’ collection

Androgyny is a continuous theme throughout your collections – why is that? And how do you think it contrasts with some of your more feminine details?
I like experimenting with contrasts and don’t want to create these categories like what’s ‘feminine’ or not. To be a woman has so many different aspects that can’t be described easily. This is what interests me the most. It’s very intuitive.

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Exclusive images of Stefanie’s studio

How many people work on your collections? Are you very hands-on in every aspect of the business?
Yes it’s basically just me. I like collaborating with people and share my ideas with them but when it comes to making the actual sample collection, I’ll do it myself. I used to have interns in the past but I sometimes have a very specific idea of how things should be made. I prefer having an assistant that’s evolving with me but moving cities so many times made this difficult. Since my goal is not to make huge collections it somehow works out for me. I simply love working with my hands. But I definitely need people around me like stylists, photographers, and textile artists to create that vision together.

Of course I know a lot about the proper business part too, but I prefer having a showroom agent than selling the collection myself. They’re just more experienced and the whole networking thing is massive. I wouldn’t be able to do that myself.

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The ‘Homesome’ presentation in Paris

Who is the most well-dressed person you know?
Basically everyone that is authentic in their wardrobe choice.

Do you wear your own pieces?
Yes, a lot.

Have you been inspired by another designer over the years? If so, who and why?
I wouldn’t call it inspired but there are of course brands I like a lot. Right now it’s Vetements for that new spirit they brought into the industry. I like people that want to change something and not strictly follow the rules.

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The ‘Homesome’ presentation in Paris

Who would you most like to see wearing your pieces?
Real women that like to change and evolve and like to have fun, are serious, have to struggle and find their way in life.

How would you describe your customer?
My customer likes clothing of good quality that you can wear for any occasion and throughout the year.

Do you think that business acumen is as important as creativity in launching your own label?
Yes totally. It’s a proper business in the end and you often can’t afford paying someone to do these things for you in the beginning . But I still think the most important thing is to know the right people from the industry. You also need a bit of luck.

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The ‘Homesome’ look book, shot by Amanda Camenisch (and main)

If your collection was a song, what would it be?
For ‘Homesome’ probably a Punk song including some strings and techno. A wild mix of everything.

Which Larry Clark movies in particular inspired the latest collection?
It was mostly Kids which transported that feeling of being connected to a group very well. You are looking for this as a teenager. You want to be part of something.

How would you like to take your work to the next level? What does the remainder of 2016 have to offer?
I just finished my latest collection ‘Hysteria’ and I am getting ready for Paris Fashion Week. I don’t know yet what will come next. I need some space to let things happen naturally.

Is there anything that we’d never see in a Stefanie Biggel collection?
I’m pretty much open to anything. There shouldn’t be too many rules.

Shop the collections at stefaniebiggel.com

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The kids are alright

02.02.2011 | Art , Blog , Culture | BY:

Larry Clark is synonymous with controversy. The word seems to trail the American photographer and filmmaker like a yappy Jack Russell wherever he shows his work. Since the publication of his 1971 book, Tulsa, Clark has been known as the agitator of teenage disorder with images of drug abuse, underage sex and violence. His 1995, Kids, remains the go-to shock film for an unflinching portrayal of teenage-hood.

Now at 67 years-old, Clark has a London show, What do you do for fun?, part-retrospective and part-showcase for new work, it features seminal Nineties shots – from the staged images in his book, 1992, to collages from on the set of Kids.

The show follows Clark’s recent exhibition at the Musee d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, where once again his work sparked controversy when the Mayor of Paris, Bertrand Delanoë, banned anyone under the age of 18 from attending. Clark declared it, “an attack on youth, on adolescents.” Prepare yourself, a contretemps is coming.

What do you do for fun? opens on the 10th February at Simon Lee Gallery

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