Alexander McQueen SS20 Campaign

Alexander McQueen recently released their Spring Summer RTW 2020 Campaign shot by Jamie Hawkesworth. The campaign features faces Vivien Solari, Felice Noordhoof and Imaan Homaam elegantly posed by the seaside.  

“Each look tells its own story. The connection between the clothes is the time it took to make them. I was interested in clarity and paring things down, in the essence of garments – stripping back to the toile. I love the idea of people having the time to make things together, the time to meet and talk together, the time to reconnect with the world.” Sarah Burton Creative director.

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The Wedding Edit: by Matches Fashion

Cover Image : Givenchy Earrings, Christopher Kane Coat at MATCHESFASHION, Photographer Eddie Wrey

This month British global luxury retailer MATCHES Fashion launched a bridal branch of it’s enterprise called The Wedding Edit. The section is dedicated to modern wedding and event dressing pieces featuring designs with the flexibility to be worn more than once. The grand archive includes 30 bespoke collections and over 250 uniques pieces created by designers specially for the launch.  All these are divided into six sections inspired by the characters of different customer muses: Romantic, The Fashion Pioneer, The Curator, The Free Spirit, The Purist and The Warrior.  Garments have been designed by names like Cecilie Bahnsen, Christopher Kane, Jil Sander, Jacquemus , Loewe , Maison Margiela, Liu Miu, The Row, Vivienne Westwood and many others. 

“We have noticed an increase in sales across our evening wear and modern tailoring categories, particularly in monochrome tones. We wanted to create a dedicated area where our clients can find unique pieces for their wedding and special events that can be worn again for many years to come. We are thrilled to partner with some of our favourite designers on special collections for the launch, from Christopher Kane, Erden and Giles to Stephen Jones and Molly Goddard,” commented Natalie Kingham , Fashion Buying Director. 

The Wedding  & Events dressing edit will be updated with regular delivery drops all year round to appeal to customers around the globe.

Alighieri Earrings at MATCHESFASHION, Photographer Eddie Wrey

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A simple idea for people talking: Andy Warhol’s editorial legacy bound in one tome, thanks to Assouline

A simple idea for people talking: Andy Warhol’s editorial legacy bound in one tome thanks to Assouline

There is a new book on the shelves of Assouline’s publishing maison on Piccadilly in London – it weighs over 5kg, it takes up more than a shelf, its hardcover is awash in acrid green and it rests in a metallic pink protective jacket. Bold, bright, brassy, beautiful: 50 years of Andy Warhol’s Interview magazine has been collated, curated and bound into a vibrant dazzle. 

Assouline’s mighty tome on this dazzling riot that was Interview Magazine lets you eavesdrop in on the romance, the righteousness, the unrest and the regalia that made and still makes Interview one of the most infamous magazines to this day. 

© Christopher Makos, June 1972

Initially contrived as a cross between the youth culture-led Rolling Stone and the nudity of Screw, Interview was due to be a riot of a success according to Andy Warhol, as it was going to be a film review magazine that was comprised of decent and relevant journalism, and sex. Having resulted instead in a zeitgeist of exceptional journalism, outrageous interviews and total creative freedom across fashion, art, music and culture, Interview turned on its head what a magazine could encompass. 

Speaking to Esther Kremer, Editor In Chief and Director of Publishing at Assouline, we discuss why the powerhouse of noble titles saw the legacy of Interview Magazine as a key opportunity to celebrate and support the reputation of what Richard Turley, Editorial Director of Interview, labelled “a mess, a big beautiful mess.”

Glenn Steigelman, November 1969

How did this retrospective of Interview Magazine come about?

On the occasion of Interview’s 50th anniversary, it seemed opportune to curate their history in a book.

Why did you feel this was a valid retrospective that needed to be published under Assouline?

Assouline is a curator of culture, we educate with strong imagery and constantly refer back to the creative leaders of the past in all our works. Interview: 50 Years is a visual text book to decades of history of film, fashion and art.

How did Interview change the publishing landscape?

In an age when magazines were all about carefully composed shoots in exotic locations by leading photographers, Andy turned publishing on its head with a real and unedited interview format for his magazine. Because he could not afford to pay writers, he just published the interviews verbatim.  He took chances by featuring young stars like Jodie Foster, the only talent he could afford  at the time, and at 18 she ended up working as a staff writer for him as well. He was innovative and ahead of his time in that regard. He was an entertainer, not just an artist,  and dreamed up ways of captivating his audience within his small operating budget.

© Glenn Steigelman, December, 1991

Do you think Interview is still a relevant publication? 

Yes, because it focuses on emerging talent, like Nick Braun (Succession) and has an edgy vibe which is presented for a sophisticated audience who understands good design. It’s different than what else is out there and many of their competitors.

What did your involvement in the creation of this title teach you about the magazine and Andy Warhol’s lateral creative vision?

Andy’s Interview shows that Innovators take risks. He had a  “go big or go home” attitude that we see today in the startup community. Andy was that kind of visionary and his creativity extended way beyond art.

Glenn Steigelman October 2002

The book is published as a mighty tome: why did you feel this was the right format for a retrospective on Interview?

The contents of the book are epic. They take readers through  what many consider the heyday of NYC. It deserves to be XXL.

Can you summarise what Interview meant to you in three words when you started work on this project ?

ANDY, NYC, INNOVATION

Can you summarise Interview in three words after creating this tome?

ANDY, NYC, INNOVATION

Interview 50 Years – 3D Cover

What would you like readers to take away from this book?

An understanding of a time where creative energy exuded from the streets of NYC and how that magic happened.

Interview is available to purchase by Assouline here: (link the ‘here’ to this: https://eu.assouline.com/products/interview-magazine-50-years)

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FENDI #MeAndMyPeekaboo ft. Yan Ni and Zou Yuanqing

In the latest #MeAndMyPeekaboo series, FENDI taps Chinese actress Yan Ni to star in an episode with her daughter Zou Yuanquing to tell the tales of their unique family bond, ringing in the Chinese New Year the FENDI way. Yan Ni rose to fame as a comic actress and she is a fun both on and off screen. My Own Swordsman starred by her has become a classic Chinese TV series, while outside the series, Yan Ni is now telling her own family story. The episode follows her throughout her journey with her Fendi  Peekaboo bag in Nappa leather and the glittering rose gold sequin Peekaboo accompany mother and daughter in their journey, continuing the narrative of the #MeAndMyPeekaboo Series and celebrating the unique bond between mother and daughter.

The  #MeAndMyPeekaboo series began last year featuring 10 iconic women across the world which included names like Kim Kardashian, Kris Jenner and North West. Each episode includes versions of the Peekaboo bags which have been seen on the latest runways.  To shop the Peekaboo visit Fendi.

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TELFAR AT PITTI UOMO: ‘THE WORLD ISN’T EVERYTHING III’

The great calibre of talent and community under the name of Telfar Clemens is no big news. Twin contributor Amanda Ballerini had the pleasure to assist the team and work closely with the Telfar community in realising their latest FW 20-21 show held at Palazzo Corsini in Florence.

The urge then came up for her to write this piece almost immediately, considering her passion for the brands since she discovered them during her studies in 2014.

The Queens/Liberian born creative who launched his eponymous label in 2005 has within these years managed not only to be an oracle of fashion but more so in the way he has shaped how we see performance and the concept of community. A community made of creatives with no boundaries, no preconceptions, the real contemporary democrats coming from all over yet all belonging to the same world.

A brand which screams: ‘It’s not for you, it’s for everyone’ as its bio, which is surely something very easy to perceive when you take a closer look at what the founder has really managed to achieve with TELFAR.

Going back to the roots which brought me where I am now, through a brand from across the ocean conceived by people who had probably seldom seen Florence.

The main highlight of the show was the great emotion created. How the New Renaissance embodied by the brand, his creator and the community surrounding him is what everyone aims to be and see and is an explanation for how we act in fashion in 2020, and why is still makes sense.

I spent 4 years of my young life in Florence and have always complained about its closed minded mentality and the fact that it is such an exclusive community. In Italy, you mainly grow within your circle and stay that way unless you move away. Which is why it is quite ironic that an apparent ‘liberal minded’ state like Italy and its bigger and smallest cities are all marked by the fact that it is actually quite exclusive.

Studying in an international school in Florence allowed me to exclude myself partially from that world, creating my own in the small reality I had available surrounding myself with dreams, parties, music, discoveries and friends. The best years of an 18 year old young woman who was always aspiring to have more in life. Years later, at the TELFAR show and afterparty last week , I finally found that more which I was looking for, and I can be very thankful for that.

As if the beauty of the location itself wasn’t enough, the set was essentially formed by a ‘tavola rotonda’ (a slight reference to the round table of King Arthur and his knights) adorned and created for the occasion by Spiral Theory Test Kitchen in association with Cordon Bleu cooking school based in Florence. It was a satirical roman empire bloodshed table which went under some surgical operation. It was the modern epitome of Renaissance, imagined by the new gods of today: the queer community of New York. Following the actual Vip dinner the night before the show, with queen beds placed in other rooms of the palace for fun & frills, the table was slightly set up but basically left in the same exact condition as the night before (and so were the beds) for the show presentation. The table served as seats for the special guests and as entrance stage for the models, who were mostly friends and family of Telfar Clemens himself who also performed live.

Appearances included the likes of  Boy Child,  Bobbi ( a part of the Spiral Theory Test kitchen trio) and even Solange whose aura glowed around the table. All these characters overlapping with journalists from very big fashion magazine and all the people who count. It was the most interesting organic mix.

The stage saw the performance of Standing on the Corner ensemble, the heart breaking voice of the young star Hawa and the angel-queen’s musical performance of Ms Carrie Stacks. The Palazzo smelled of meat, fruits, and any other possible leftovers and it somehow still had a fragrance which you wanted to carry home with you. Perhaps it simply smelled of deep love.

What I can say about the after party (set at Super Studio founded Space Club in collaboration with Stefano Pilati) is that it was the perfect ending of the whole shebang . It was the cherry on top.

The soul that each person, friend, lover, fan, family member and new friends put in all of this screamed authenticity and gratitude from each and every corner.

Speaking as an Italian myself and on behalf of the city of Florence, we are the ones who are most grateful. Grateful and filled with the biggest tears of joy in our eyes for the whole, black, queer, all inclusive and incredible vibe of community that TELFAR brought to all our hearts.

It is not for you, it is for everyone of us, and it is the future.


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MFW Men’s: Fendi’s FW20 Man of The Future

Men’s Fall Winter 2020-21 marked the dawn of a fresh new direction for creative director Silvia Venturini Fendi. This season, guests were invited to the FENDI headquarters in Milan to witness the presentation of Madam Fendi described as the man of tomorrow. With this notion, she crafted a collection with retro-futurist undertones. The goal was to approach menswear and clothing on a whole from an entirely different perspective, seeing a garment as a body wallet.

A vessel which can and should evolve throughout time. Inside – out constructions and quilting were traced across blazers, coats cut in compact matte satin and outerwear shapes in waterproof gabardine were bonded with felt tabs and FENDI Roma taped seams. There was a sort of gender fluidity throughout the collection, as some jackets were cropped and  a few pants were tailored to move like skirts. 

The house also debuted pieces of their collaboration with Japanese designer Anrealage who added a selection of photochromic outerwear and accessories that transform with the FF logo when exposed to UV sunlight.

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Tallawah: A Jamaican story by Jawara & Nadine Ijewere

Later this month photographer Nadine Ijewere and hair stylist Jawara will reveal an exhibition titled Tallawah in collaboration with Dazed Beauty at the Cob Gallery in London.

The showcase takes it’s name from the Jamaican patois word Tallawah, which means small but nonetheless fearless and strong-willed. Throughout the exhibition, Jawara explores his childhood of growing up in Kingston during the peak of Dancehall culture and the influence of creativity in the fashion & hairstyling by the women around him. For photographer Nadine Ijewere, she dives into her Nigerian-Jamaican heritage and aims to paint an image of the stories shared by her mother about the island of Jamaica. 

“This project is very close to my heart,” said Ijewere in a statement. “It was empowering to be able to explore part of my heritage by photographing these beautiful, strong people. The relationship between hair and identity is one I wanted to capture and celebrate – it’s a story that’s important to tell.”

Jawara added: “Small but Strong. Likkle but Tallawah. The strength and beauty of Jamaica.”

Tallawah opens it’s doors at the Cob Gallery in London on January 23rd and will run until February 1st. 

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MFW Men’s: Prada’s FW20 Contradictions and Dichotomies

This menswear season, creative director Miuccia Prada was conflicted, stuck between contradictions and dichotomies as the theme for her FW20 menswear collection.

Guests were invited into the classic PRADA space in Milan, which was transformed by AMO into two identical voids. Situating the audience above looking down on the depths of a colourful arena like runway with a white statue of a man on a horse centrestage.  The collection itself was a bridge between opposites: new & old, past & present. Madam Prada played on the notion of creating classic menswear with subtle touches of modernity. Some models donned full three piece linen suits white others sported versions of the house’s classic nylon fits.

There were stylised gumboots, leather & shearling vests and a flash of pajama patterns in liking to the work of artists during the Vienna Secessions which signalled towards the finale (these are bound to be a hit by Prada fanatics ). This season the designer took the time to deliver a collection which she described as optimistic and valuable. 

“ I thought to give an indication that only thing that makes me calm and optimistic is to give value to work… to give value to things that matter any our life and your work, and so the creativity is mixed with technicalities, which is a little bit similar to the Secessionist period when ideas, creativity, and actual work had to be all together,” she explained. 

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MFW Men’s: Alexander McQueen’s FW20 Sartorial Romance

For the first time, British fashion house Alexander McQueen presented it’s menswear collection during Milan Fashion Week earlier this week. 

For FW20, creative director Sarah Jane Burton, created poetry, and no, this is not in referral to the violinists who welcomed guests into the space with their ever so elegant strums, but rather in regards to the symphonious binding of fabrics and tailoring carried out throughout the collection. 

Many may argue that classic menswear in its purest form is a straight line, a linear scale of techniques and patterns that must be followed and abided by at all costs. Yet with this collection, it is as if Burton breaks up the parts of a puzzle, and pieces them back together in an entirely different way no one knew was possible. 

With inspiration from Northern landscapes , the designer crafted a collection of razor tailored razor sharps suits , and doubled breasted overcoats  inspired by minerals rocks and stones. Coats and jackets were rendered in grey sharkskin mohair and black wool are spliced and slashed, echoing the lines of military harnessing. Panels from classic military coats cut into signature tailoring and camel overcoats. 

Each look was made and styled with an intricate level of artistry. An added touch were are the silk suits and coats that were printed with an engineered artwork of Henry Moore, Three-Quarter Figure 1928, reproduced courtesy of the Henry Moore Foundation. 

A few pieces were created in reference to the house’s SS20 womenswear collection like some of the shoes and a few accessories. Nonetheless, the designer’s approach to menswear is a breath of fresh air for the industry. Serving as the perfect example that there is no one way of creating elegance, no one way of creating menswear, the options are not limited to classic or street but is open to a vast variety of undiscovered proposals. 

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MFW Men’s : Marni’s FW20 Dance

Let’s dance.

Let’s dance ’til the end of love.

Let’s dance our best days away.

Let’s dance to keep the abyss at bay.

Let’s dance until everything changes.

Until fashion flows, in a blow.

Let’s dance.

Like a body of work,

To the rhythm

of a hymn.

Was an excerpt from, “ A call from Prince Prospero,” a part of Marni’s FW20 men’s press release. This season creative director Francesco Riso escorted  his audience into a psychedelic trance of poetic movement. With the help of choreographer Michele Rizzo , the designer curated a performance which seamlessly crafted garments as a creative collective. Clothing was given new life by matching pieces which were crafted from once useless scraps. Trousers were composed of multi coloured fabrics, trench coats bisected and reassembled from a variety of textures. Left sides were asymmetric to right, hems scaled like waves and pants bore holes just small enough to appear eaten.

Every look was deliberately curated to fit too wide, or too long or too big. With a unconventional approach to tailoring, each piece fit so wrong yet so right. A side from the magnificent performance, the clothing spoke in a way that was paradoxically trendy, with a voice that only some could hear, appealing to a customer that understands what it means to be entranced by  fashion with a capital F. 

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Prada SS20 Menswear Campaign – An Optimist Rhythm

For Spring Summer 2020 , Prada platforms a trinity of contemporary creatives for the faces of their latest menswear campaign. On theme with the SS20 show which took place in Shanghai last year under the themes of duality, reinvention & boyish optimism, the Italian house tapped musician Frank Ocean, actor Austin Butler and director/screenwriter/producer Nicolas Winding as creatives in control of their own invention under the light of Prada SS20.

  Shot by photographer David Sims, the campaign features profiles of each talent embodying & portraying their individual definitions of the Prada man. The Prada SS20 collection will soon be available online & in stores, visit Prada to discover the full campaign.  

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Twin Talks: Azur – Luxury Sustainability from the South of France

Images courtesy of Andreas Lumineau

Late last year graphic design & textile design duo Lisa Favreau and Lisa Guedel-Dolle launched their luxury sustainable brand from the coast of Marseille, France. Dubbed AZUR, the brand prides itself in the design and production of high quality fashionable clothing and accessories using processes and techniques which are ethically and environmentally compatible. Each piece is made from a mix of natural fibres, antique 20th century textiles and luxury materials sourced in France. Textiles and buttons are naturally dyed with with plants, labels are made in Italy from recycled plastic bottles & packaging is crafted from recycled & recyclable textiles. The scale of production is closely monitored to match demand and to ensure that each garment pockets its own unique story with fabrics that hold their own history. Twin sat down with the design duo, to find out some more about their process. 

What sparked the idea of launching a sustainable brand ?

During the past years we were less and less comfortable with the fact that what we were doing was often too far from our beliefs. We thought that we could use our creative skills and energy for a more positive purpose. Step by step the project started to take shape in our minds.

Long before turning into a clothing project, Azur was first and foremost a strong desire to change the way we were working and creating, to go towards more sustainable practices. At first we didn’t know if it was going to turn into objects, furniture or pieces of clothing. Making truly ethical and eco-conscious clothing ended up being the most challenging of them all. 

Why did you decide on naming the brand Azur ? 

Azur is the color that is often described as the color of the sky on a clear day.

We were deeply touched by the way Paul Virilio, a french philosopher, evokes nature and colours while talking about l’azur:

«L’azur c’est l’épaisseur optique de l’atmosphère, la grande lentille du globe terrestre, sa brillante rétine. De l’outremer à l’outre-ciel, l’horizon départage la transparence de l’opacité. De la matière-terre à l’espace-lumière, il n’y a qu’un pas, celui du bond ou de l’envol capables de nous affranchir un instant de la gravité.» 

Paul Virilio in La vitesse de la libération.

We also liked that Azur is a much-used word in south of France for any kind of brand or business. It gives the brand a déjà vu feeling while remaining quite mysterious and poetic. 

How long did it take to create an entire collection using completely sustainable techniques and materials? 

To avoid overproduction and enhance existing raw materials, we source high quality natural antique fabrics woven in France in early 20th century. Fabrics and buttons are naturally hand-dyed with dye plants by us in our studio, using no chemicals or heavy metal. Our 100% cotton thread and natural corozo buttons are made by the last French sewing thread mill and the last button manufacturer in France. Except our labels which are made in Italy from recycled plastic bottles, we avoid any plastic. The lining of our clothes is made of cotton without glue and our packaging is made in France with recycled and recyclable materials. Each piece is sewn in Marseille by our prototypist or a garment workshop run by a mother and daughter. Our silk pieces are hand-pleated in Marseille in an atelier running by two sisters and own by their family since 1937. Everything is made by us, craftsmen or small companies located as close as possible from Marseille.

Every step of the production process is meticulously watched out by the two of us, to be fundamentally respectful of the environment and others.

It took about a year to set up our sourcing and production processes : finding the best materials, the right partners and finally the proper way to combine them all. 

Once all these parameters settled, create an entire collection made in a sustainable way sure takes a longer time than in an ordinary way, but still allows to create a full collection, even in significant quantities. 

What was the most difficult part of the process ? 

Trying to be fundamentally respectful of the environment and people impact a lot our designs and the creative direction of our brand in general. The major part of our creative result is inherent to the artisanal process and the sustainable approach we have set up.

The sourcing of our raw materials is the biggest constraint and restricts many of our desires. We have to reverse the usual creative process. First we list what and how we can produce following our ethos, and then, we start the creative process. 

It was important to us to make clothes that you can keep for a long time and make compatible to every wardrobe. We create mainly unisex pieces, with simple cuts but unique details, which can fit most bodies. 

We are aware that not everything can be produced within our constraints, which can be frustrating sometimes, but which is also really challenging and exciting. 

Do you think the industry in general is on its way to becoming less wasteful?

People are now more aware and concerned about the environmental issues, and big brands have to follow this movement and adapt themselves to the new consumers expectations. Most of the time it’s unfortunately more about their image rather than real commitments.

On an other hand, many independents and emerging fashion brands are really active and aware when it comes to sustainability, and are opening a new path. Through Azur we hope to show in some way that you can make truly eco-conscious and ethical clothes that can also be luxurious.  

No one has the perfect formula, and both makers and designers should work together to build fairer and cleaner making processes.

How many collections can we expect a year from Azur?

We don’t follow the exact same calendar as the fashion industry. We will launch 2 collections per year, and the rest of the time will be punctuated by few drops, according to our desires and fabrics we find.

Where can one buy the products? 

You can buy the collection online on our website at azur.world

In February we will move into an atelier-boutique where you will be able to see and try the collection and unique pieces that will not be available online. The address is 19 rue du Chevalier Roze, 13002 Marseille, France. We’re currently working on supplying to shops internationally for our next few collection. 

Keep up with the brand via instagram on @AzurWorld 

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Fendi Botanical Wonder ft. Timmy Xu

In Fendi’s latest episode for their Peekaboo series, the Italian fashion house taps Chinese singer/actor & FENDI spokesperson Timmy Xu.  In a bucolic dialogue between man and nature, Xu immerses himself on a journey through nature as he travels from the FENDI catwalk into luscious greenery, peekaboo bag in hand. He clutches the model from the SS20 collection made from perforated lather panel combined with mink intarsia, a display of the perfect balance of sophistication of functionality. The Fendi peekaboo bag is currently available online.    

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Jil Sander SS20 Campaign – A Scenic Italian Roadtrip

Jil Sander creative directors Lucie and Luke Meier went on an Italian road trip with photographer Olivier Kervern for their latest SS20 Campaign. Set before the scenic views of the island of Sicily , the photographer captures the beauty in key elements of the landscape shared with the duo’s intricate work.

“The beauty in the balance of conflicting yet complementary elements that runs throughout Lucie & Luke Meiers work at Jil Sander has here one of its mirrors. Harmony within opposites, open fields and Baroque, fluid and sculptural forms, masculine and feminine, concrete and lace. Archetypes, ascetic and voluptuous.”

 In the campaign , both male and female models are shot sporting key pieces from the collection which aid in creating ardent moments of emotion and poetic movement.  The Jil Sander SS20 collection will soon be available online

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Gucci x Disney New Year Capsule Collection

Not long ago, Gucci announced their second collaboration with Walt Disney in preparation for the Chinese New Year 2020.  In celebration of 2020 — the Year of the Mouse, the partnership sees a lineup of Mickey Mouse branded goods fused with the signature Gucci aesthetic.  A stand out piece being the GG logo canvas coat features all-over miniature Mickeys, tracks suits, jumpers, bag packs, purses, bucket hats and sneakers feature similar designs. 

Just in time for the new year, the Italian brand also released the accompanying campaign featuring some signature Gucci faces and the mascot himself staged at Disneyland.  Shot by Harmony Korine, the campaign captures moments of an adventurous day between rollacoasters, tea-cup rides and cotton candy on the grounds of the most magical place on earth.  The Disney x Gucci capsule collection is set to be released on January 3rd online and select stores worldwide. 

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“The Hoodie” – An exhibition by the Het Nieuwe Instituut

If one was to compose a list of the most political articles of clothing in modern day fashion, the hoodie would undoubtedly be in the top five of that line up. The garment which went through it’s prime evolution period with Champion in the 1930’s has grown to tell a variety of several narratives including perspectives in music, subculture, androgyny, gender fluidity and most pressingly tales of social equality. Throughout the past two decades with the aid of the media, the hoodie has come to be accused as the narrators in many cases of police brutality & racism. 

“The Hoodie” exhibition, recently opened at the Het Nieuwe Instituut Rotterdam curated by water and curator Lou Stoppard is an in-depth mixed media showcase involving artworks, garments, printed matter, digital footage, social media posts and other cultural artefacts to tell the story of the garment’s history in society.

It explores and examines conversation themes which enable its viewer to consider and reflect on the hoodie’s complicated relationship with contemporary culture from streetwear icon to workwear to political garment. It features work from a lineup of seminal artists and photographers including David Hammons , Campbell Addy, Sasha Huber, John Edmonds & Lucy Orta as well as brands such as Rick Owens, Off-White, VETEMENETS and Vexed Generation.  The exhibition will run until April 2020 and will also be accompanied by a digital magazine featuring specially commissioned essays, interviews and visuals. 

‘February II, 2019’ by Devan Shimoyama
‘EUnify – Berlin 2019’ by Ari Versluis & Ellie Uyttenbroek,  Exactitudes 168 

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FENDI launches gender FFLUID sneakers

The latest venture of Italian Maison Fendi sees the launch of a model of sneakers suitable for the likes of all genders. The gender fluid design features arch shapes and curved lines that accentuate a signature chunky sole. Its design is crafted from a selection of fabrics including a glossy neoprene or technical mesh for its upper, as well as a tone-tone suede on its body. 

The colour way ranges from white, black to reds and a pop of pink.  The sneaker also features a 35mm heel which subtly adds an extra boost of height. The FENDI FFluid will soon be available in boutiques in a new sporty lace-up version with trekking laces from December 2019. Visit FENDI for more info. 

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Unsigned – a new zine curated by BBH dedicated to showcasing diverse undiscovered talents

Unsigned came to fruition by dint of strong will, creative vision and a desire to celebrate emerging talent in all its forms. 

Surrounded by creatives struggling to find sufficient avenues to showcase their work, Tom Burns felt inspired to provide an event that allowed just this. Working alongside Art Director Stephanie Flynn, Film producer Nnena Nwakodo and Strategist Sofia Bodger at the global advertising agency BBH – they saw an opportunity to do just this at the agency. Through its creative department UP @ BBH – the cultural heart of BBH, a curated programme of art, music, film, technology, talks and events – this team launched the first Unsigned in 2018. 

Twin spoke with the Unsigned team and a selection of artists included in the most recent issue of it’s zine to learn more about its journey towards democratising the creative industry. 

The idea itself was initially pitched as a talent fair to be hosted at BBH; The idea would be to invite a variety of artists into the agency to pitch up a space and showcase their work, with their books and prints on show for people to view. When the idea was given the go ahead, and the team established, they went on to develop the concept and see how it could be best placed within the industry.

 Unsigned grew out of their close and insightful collaboration. The team explains; 

“Our observation was that the advertising industry was losing relevance. In 1990, 31% of UK adults thought that the adverts were as good as the programme, in 2018 it dropped to a meagre 14% (TGI, 2018). One reason for this is that we too often resort to established talent over emerging talent. More so than ever before. Tighter deadlines and smaller budgets mean it’s easy to become complacent. To take the safe route. Brands are nervous and need to sell, which leads to producers and creatives alike defaulting to that ‘safe pair of hands’ talent rather than taking a risk.”

Unsigned was created as a tool to challenge perspectives within the agency, opening its eyes to the plethora of individuals working within the creative and cultural realms who may often be overlooked for commissioned work due to a lack of experience; Unsigned was an opportunity for us to observe the pool of fantastic, diverse makers surrounding us. 

Attending degree shows, using social media, call outs, word-of-mouth, and recommendations to source talent, the team explored every avenue in order to find and showcase raw, cutting edge and diverse content; 

“Over the months, the artists would be invited into the agency to meet and chat through their work. They’d often bring in a portfolio, or perhaps an iPad and go through their projects. It’s been an incredibly exciting experience meeting all these artists and has massively enhanced the team’s art buying knowledge. It’s also been an invaluable way to remain educated on current trends within the art world, and take note on some of the key narratives that lead their work.”

Speaking with photographers and visual storytellers Anett Pósalaki, Jonathan Wykes, Daniel Jackont and Domino Leaha from this year’s issue provides insight into the events success as offering visibility to emerging talent within the creative industry. 

Born in Hungary, Anett Pósalaki’s images are not replicas of a reality, not even composed alternative dimensions. Instead, they are lucky segments of life, where everything has found its perfect place. Pósalaki explains;

“these little details become a manifesto of quietness, leaving a sense of what life should be. My work is to show all the tranquility around me, around everyone. “

For Pósalaki, the zine gave her the opportunity to showcase her work to a new audience, offering up potential collaborations with designers and magazines. Similarly both Daniel Jackont and Domino Leah highlight the access that Unsigned provided for them as foreigners to London’s creative scene. 

Living and working in Tel Aviv, Burns came across the photographic work of Jackont through instagram; 

“Earlier this year, Tom discovered my work and invited me to join the Unsigned exhibition. The event’s concept gave me an opportunity to make acquaintance with new approaches and mix different styles of photography and visual arts. Presenting my work alongside brilliant artists and creators from all around the globe. Thanks to the exhibition, I was noticed and have been contacted with regards to inquiries and UK representation.”

Originating from a small village in Italy, Domino Leaha’s images are often intimate snapshots into the lives of her subjects; 

“I like to capture their vulnerability, without touching them. I think of them as delicate objects. They are precious to me. I want to see their scars I want to push their boundaries and see how far they will let go. I am interested in those boundaries that lie between strangers. There is an immense mystery in that space, it is a place where anything is possible. “

Describing herself as shy, Domino explains the importance of Unsigned to help elevate and promote her work; 

“I don’t like to share or advertise my work a lot so for me it was really a challenge to be able to do this and I felt great. Also the opportunity to be seen and that people can actually asked to work for them or share your work is amazing. “

Image by Jonathan Wykes

British photographer Jonathan Wykes draws inspiration from popular culture – with an interest in fashion and hair styling – fusing these elements together to present a fantasised version of his subjects. For Wykes, Unsigned was the first public showcasing of his works; 

“It introduced me to a community of other unrepresented artists out there, having the opportunity to be featured in an exhibition of upcoming talent has definitely been an exciting experience for me. The exposure from the show has been beneficial and I’m extremely grateful to Tom Burns and the rest of the team for recognising all of our work and for bringing us all together.”

Since 2018 the Unsigned zine has grown from featuring 31 artists across Film, Photography and Illustration to now include an additional total of 49. This year’s exhibition to celebrate its second issue attracted over 600 visitors, featuring 33 large scale prints and over 350 prints as well as 9 individual screenings for the directors, which included an installation by exciting up and coming filmmaker Starkie Reay. 2019 also featured a live performance from soul sister duo, The KTNA. The team itself expanded in its second year to accommodate its fine execution, with Beth Mechem, Thandi Mibre, Lauren Gillies and Angus Lees completing the Unsigned team. 

This BBH initiative will continue to bring underrepresented emerging talent to the fore, providing a platform for this work within the agency and the wider industry. Stay tuned for Unsigned’s 2020 plans, which Burns explains are to make it: … “bigger, better and even more collaborative. We want to push the creative potential, and make sure we are vigilant of being as inclusive to all different diversities along the way.”

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“The Mirrors Within” , by Bolade Banjo

Photographer Bolade Banjo recently announced the release of his photographic story “The Mirrors within” in the latest issue of i-D Magazine. The inspiration behind the series stemmed from the work of photographer Anna Puschel’s book Layer of Reality where she explores experiences with the concept of Synesthesia, which is the condition of connecting colours, emotions and memories. From this , the photographer took away the knowledge of how the tonality of colours hold connections to memory and inherit acts as an emotional factor of life. Which is how he began exploring the archive of his reportage shot in the past few years and was able to spot the moments which these patterns had manifested themselves and now had been evident as emotive inspirations for samples of his present day work.  

“I’ve come to understand reflection is a process that allows for personal expansion and greater awareness, something that has taken me some time to accept. Looking back at this rhythmic arrangement. I’m able to connect all these collected moments to navigate the ever-changing world, ” he explains. 

Throughout the series, Banjo takes his audience on a sensorial journey throughout the  concerning nature’s various channel of perceiving memory as he connects moments and images that from a wider view, acts almost as an visual auto-biography of his artistic journey. The full version of the story can be found in i-D Winter issue NO.358 – 2019. 

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Roses – An exhibition by Alexander McQueen

Roses : The symbolism of flowers is rooted in the power of nature, is the theme behind Alexander McQueen’s recently opened exhibition at their store on Old Bond Street in London. The showcase has been all curated around two of the brand’s iconic closing pieces designed around the form and energy of flowers. The most recent being the swirling red Rose dress crafted by Sarah Burton which closed the Alexander McQueen Autumn/Winter 2019 show, and the other an intricate dress constructed by Lee Alexander McQueen himself with fresh flower for the end of the Sarabande SS2007 show. 

Throughout the exhibit, the complex shaping of the Red Rose dress is documented through a variety of methods including the showcase of samples and background research as well as a video featuring head of atelier Judy Halil, as she takes us through the step by step process at the McQueen studios. The Sarabande dress, once filled with fresh flowers is now set at the entrance of the showcase, accompanied by other flower inspired pieces from the SS2007 collection as well as gowns with English roses, camellias , exploded carnation-shapes , garden flowers and bees that fill the space. 

Guests are also invited to walk among each piece, pick up each label and discovery the history behind each dress. Roses can be found on the second floor of the Alexander McQueen store and is now open to the public. 

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