Louis Vuitton AW18 brings a new vision for strong women

07.03.2018 | Blog , Fashion | BY:

Military yet undone, matching but out of synch, the Louis Vuitton AW18 show brought to life a new vision of powerful women. The show was all about turning the expected on its head, and there was a palpable sense of strangeness and mystery throughout. Bags were carried on their sides, rather than upright; eye make-up streaked across one eye but left the other bare; traditional silhouettes such as pencil skirts and cashmere polo necks were mixed with peplum leather jackets and suede-shouldered pale yellow, shearling jackets. It was Nicolas Ghesquiere at his savviest, blending femininity and power to offer an original vision. Here’s to the new era.

Louis Vuitton AW18

Louis Vuitton AW18

Louis Vuitton AW18

Louis Vuitton AW18

Louis Vuitton AW18

Louis Vuitton AW18

 

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Betty Catroux, Saint Laurent muse, stars in Fall 2018 campaign

07.03.2018 | Fashion | BY:

The new Saint Laurent Fall 2018 campaign is fronted by the iconic Betty Catroux. Captured by David Sims, the black and white film celebrates the lasting appeal, confidence and power of the original modern woman. Watch it in full below.

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Foam new talent exhibition

04.03.2018 | Art , Culture | BY:

Foam magazine opens their new talent exhibition later this month, a celebration of 20 emerging photographers from across the globe. An annual event which seeks to give a platform to the best of new names coming through, Foam’s support has helped to launch the careers of many young photographers.

This year sees an exciting spectrum of work. Photographs by Hari Srikhao from Thailand comment on the role of the monarchy in society, while Vasantha Yogananthan captures the journey of the Hindu deity Rama in India. There are photo sculptures by American Mark Dorf, and intense examinations of the body by Alix Marie.

See highlights from emerging photography talents below.

Visit Foam New Talent exhibition in Amsterdam, London, New York and Frankfurt, from March 22nd 2018. Dates will vary.

From the series Kawakubo Interpreter of Dreams, 2017 | © Erik Madigan Heck

Untitled 1, 2015, from the series Traces, 2015 | © Weronika Gesicka, 2017

Landscape 16, from the series Transposition, 2017 | © Mark-Dorf

Featured image credit: Secret Door 2016, from the series A Myth of Two Souls 2013, ongoing | © Vasantha Yogananthan

 

 

 

Shoot the Women First: Twin meets artist Navine G. Khan-Dossos

02.03.2018 | Art , Blog | BY:

Navine G. Khan-Dossos’ latest exhibition at The Breeder in Athens considers the theme of targets. Entitled Shoot The Women First, it draws on a command reported to be issued in the 1980s to members of West Germany’s elite GSG-9 anti-terrorist squad. The order forms the title of a book by Eileen McDonald, one of the many influences that worked to inform Dossos’ complex and multi-layered exhibition.

The opening of the exhibition on the first floor recreates a shooting range. The paintings begin with targets that use abstract shapes, and build until their depictions of humans are wholly recognisable. This movement to clarity is uneasy: at the moment you recognise the object, you also process a human will be shot. All the paintings are taken from actual targets. The tension is there again, with the paintings operating both as art and as a direct reflection of institutionalised killing. Curated as a shooting range, the audience is complicit in this complex relationship too – both a gallery visitor and a watchful bystander.

Downstairs in the gallery symbols on paintings refer to Discretionary Command training. Trainee shooters receive a chain of commands which require them to shoot at shapes and colours in a certain order. These objects represent an abstraction of human from human, and also of State from the individual. Especially of those considered to threaten existing structures.

Pink in Athens doesn’t have the millennial fashion connotations that it does in other European cities. Instead it evokes the colours of walls outside the brothels in the Metaxourgeio area, also the location of The Breeder gallery. The downstairs series was also informed by recent historical events around the area, specifically a case against a group of female drug-users in 2012, who were forced to take HIV tests. The women were publicly persecuted by the media and accused of grievous bodily harm for transmitting the virus through sex work.  The use of the colour in her paintings then opens up new interpretations; pink is no longer beautiful, but violent. A shadow of war-mongering red. As is typical throughout the exhibition, Khan-Dossos offers a new way of seeing. The viewer is taken by surprise.

Navine G.Khan-Dossos, Grey Discretionary Command Series I-VIII, 2017 | Photos courtesy of The Breeder / © Alexandra Masmanidi

A graduate of Art at Cambridge University, Arabic at Kuwait University, Islamic Art at the Prince’s School of Traditional Art in London, and with an MA in Fine Art from Chelsea College of Art & Design, Navine G. Khan-Dossos brings a rigorous and intellectual approach to understanding the world around us. Her abstract paintings allow for an ontological study of shapes and symbols; historical references from both East and West, alongside contemporary digital contexts, examine and reflect on themes such as the depiction of European converts to radical Islam (‘Echo Chamber’, 2017), to the use of symbols and codes in the creation of crossrail at the House of St Barnabas in London (A Year Without Movement, 2017).

Her works are often site specific, and multi-dimensional. The opening of Shoot the Women First was accompanied with a performance by – enacting the shifting relationship between the collective and the other. Twin caught up with Navine to discuss the performance of identities and the idea of the other.

When did you first encounter Eileen McDonald’s text? What was the immediate impact it had on you? 

Shoot The Women First by Eileen MacDonald was given to me for Christmas by my partner a couple of years ago. It raised a few eyebrows around the Christmas tree, that’s for sure. But my partner knows me pretty well, and given my long-term interest in female terrorists, it was a perfect gift for me. I read it immediately and have read it again many times since. But I also have shared it with those Im working with on this project, in order for us all to begin the conversation from the same page.

The book is (as far as I know) the first attempt by a journalist to tackle the subject of female terrorists, and given when it was written in 1991, the interviews she conducts are with women whose memories and experiences of conflict and action are very recent and you can really feel that in the fabric of the book. 

There are problems with it, such as an over-arching narrative that supposes that the violent political cause is somehow a child replacement for female terrorists; a cause into which they can put their maternal drive. This reduces women to a biological imperative of motherhood rather than seeing them as having genuine political will of their own, unconnected to their ovaries. This line of conclusion certainly dates the book, but I think as an archive of a specific time in history and the role of women within that turbulence, it’s a very valuable document and an inspiring one to begin something new to continue this dialogue in our own times.

Navine G.Khan-Dossos, Bulk Target 1-100, 2018 | courtesy of The Breeder / ©  Alexandra Masmanidi

In the accompanying essay to the exhibition Lisa Downing surmises that ‘ A “target,” then, by necessity, moves.’  What about this dynamic interested you?

Beyond this essay for the show, Lisa Downing thinks and writes more broadly about the role of the individual woman, the difficult woman, or the woman who finds herself unable to be part of a collective we and I think this is the issue that underpins the target too. How does a woman stand apart but also identify with the group? The question of the target, for me, is tied up in this question of the individual and the multitude, being able to be alone but without being isolated or singled out for attack. And I think this is a pertinent question we must take forward with us into a future where we dont have to be vulnerable or further this otherness by individuating oneself.

Through the curation and the targets you open a discussion around complicity – where do you hope the viewer will place themselves in this dialogue?

I really dont have any expectation of where the viewer should place themself within the work. It isnt so didactic as to suggest one position. The intention is to keep things open, to reflect on the many roles that can be played out in the scenario of the shooting gallery: the target, the target designer, the shooter, the bystander, the amateur weekend gun enthusiast, the professional killer. 

Navine G.Khan-Dossos, Shoot the Women First, Grey Discretionary Command Series I-VIII, 2017 |courtesy of The Breeder / ©  Alexandra Masmanidi

Why was it important to you to have a performance element of the exhibition? How did the collaboration come about?

This is the first time I have collaborated with a choreographer (Yasmina Reggad) and a group of dancers. Over a coffee in my studio when I was making he cardboard targets, Yamsina noticed how much the drying works resembled costumes, or certainly had the possibility of being worn. With her experience and her eyes, she saw not just the abstracted figure within the target, but how it could be embodied, given movement, and activated as part of the works scope beyond painting. 

It was a very natural collaboration and Yasmina and I have been thinking and practicing together over the past weeks and months to think how we can work in parallel and share this common ground of interest. 

The dancers will perform a mixture of martial arts-based movements choreographed within patterns used by riot police in crowd control situations. They will move those attending the opening of the show, pushing them out of the gallery, and controlling them through these delicate but powerful gestures. 

Shoot the Women First performance, choreographed by Yasmina Reggad for Navine G. Khan-Dossos exhibition opening | photo courtesy of the artist / ©  Alexandra Masmanidi

Im become quite fascinated by what a female army might look like in the future. The Kurdish female fighters of the YPJ (Kurdish Protection Units) continue to be a strong presence in my thoughts everyday, but I wonder also what ways of fighting and controlling crowds might be possible through other forms of intervention, which is why the inclusion of the martial arts is an interesting mode to explore. In a show that is dominated by the act of shooting and guns, this attempt to circumnavigate the use of this kind of instrument of violence is a way of imagining different possibilities for the future.  

In the show text you reference specific examples of the 2012 arrests of suspected sex workers in Athens, as well as other major moments of terrorism throughout contemporary history. Can you talk a little about your research process, and why the story of the Greek women spoke to you in particular?

From the moment I found out about this story I was gripped by it, but also by the way it effected the Greek people I asked about it, and how they recalled that moment in time. I wasnt yet living in Athens myself in 2012, so it was very much about exploring collective memory as well as more in-depth research. This case in some ways is very simple  an action made in the weeks leading up to a general election to make it look like the city was being cleaned up. But the complexity of the intermeshing subjects of HIV, of sex work, of the sanctity of family unit in Greece, also coalesce into something of great tragedy for the women at the heart of the events.

One of the first and most important influences on this research was the film Ruins by Zoe Mavroudi. She presented the story and the politics of what happened to these women in 2012 with a great dignity and power. Zoe and I discussed the making of the film and the issues surrounding it, but also the present situations of these women, and how not to lose sight of this case, but without re-presenting the women at the centre of the arrests, furthering the exploitation of their image.

Zoe introduced me to Apostolis Kalogiannis who was able to deepen my understanding of the current situation of sex work in Athens and how it has changed (or not) since 2012. This was an important way of grounding myself in the present rather than just looking back onto a concluded past event. There are important groups supporting vulnerable sex workers in Athens and there are ways for us to support their work through art, and by keeping the subject alive and visible.

Νavine G.Khan-Dossos, Pink Discretionary Command Series V-XII, 2017 | courtesy of The Breeder / ©  Alexandra Masmanidi

We spoke about the desire to focus on this story without re-enacting the violence that the women experienced in 2012. Could you elaborate on your approach to this?

The works are not and should never be considered a re-enactment of the situation in 2012. Those events are part of a much wider series of influences that went into making the works. But one important aspect that did derive directly from the issues raised by that case was how to represent women without returning to the low-grade viral images that swept through the Internet and the Greek media when the story broke.

I do not believe we need to re-present or indeed rely on these damaging images. Instead there must be a way to use a functional, diagrammatical, symbolic language that tells a wider story about the abstraction of the human body as a necessary device to distance oneself from the subject/target.

It is possible to make work about violence that in itself is not violent. It can be a contemplative or meditative space instead of a shocking one  a space where the viewer can consider the subject matter and recall what they already know inside themselves, including their own experiences, rather than forcing my narrative upon them.

I have been working on this approach to portraying difficult subject matter for a few years now, and it always changes depending on the subject matter. But I feel strongly that in this time of mass consumption of digital images of violence, there might be other ways to talk about it that don’t rely on the images themselves and getting caught up in that loop of the poor or degraded image (as Hito Steyerl might say). 

Νavine G.Khan-Dossos, Pink Discretionary Command Series V-XII, 2017 | courtesy of The Breeder / ©  Alexandra Masmanidi

Do particular shapes and colours present themselves instinctively or do you always approach shapes and symbols to use in your work based on their pre-existing references and meanings?

All of my material comes from things that exist in the real world as functional objects or images. In this case all the paintings are based on Discretionary Command targets  a form of shooting practice target that relies on listening to commands and shooting the coloured shapes in the order given. So the shapes and colours have an inherent meaning within this context and a relationship to the human body in terms of organs (shoot to kill) and limbs (shoot to maim).

I have also included pink triangles as an additional shape to the pre-existing forms of the command targets, as a way of including the history and politics of the gay rights movement, which also has an important place in this work about the targeting of marginalised groups. 

Shoot The Women First is on at The Breeder Gallery, Athens, until March 10th. 

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Meet the finalists of LOEWE Craft Prize 2018

28.02.2018 | Art , Blog , Culture | BY:

The Loewe Craft Prize will take place in May of this year, and already there’s a buzz around the finalists. Comprising of 30 artists from 17 countries around the world, the shortlist celebrates creativity and innovation in craft. A reflection of the diverse talents working at the moment.

Creative director of LOEWE Jonathan Anderson conceived the award to champion creativity. A part of an ongoing commitment to locate LOEWE within a wider cultural context. Speaking ahead of the second year of the awards, the designer commented: ‘Craft is the essence of LOEWE. As a house, we are about craft in the purest sense of the word. That is where our modernity lies, and it will always be relevant.’

The full list of nominees, along with examples of their work, are below.

Paul Adie (United Kingdom)

Paul Adie searching for solid ground III

Gunilla Maria Åkesson (Sweden)

Gunilla Maria Aakesson

ARKO (Japan)

Arko Asako Sato

Yeonsoon Chang (Republic of Korea)

Chang Yeonsoon, MatrixIII Time, Space, Human.

Min Chen (China)

Chen Min

Hae Cho Chung (Republic of Korea)

Hae Cho Chung

Steffen Dam (Denmark)

Stefan Dam

Sam Tho Duong (Germany)

Sam Tho Duong

Sara Gackowska (Poland)

Sara Gackowska

Ann van Hoey (Belgium)

Ann Van Hoey: 2017. The Earthenware Ferrari

Joe Hogan (Ireland)

Joe Hogan

Marie Janssen (Austria)

Marie Janssen

Joonyong Kim (Republic of Korea)

Joonyong Kim

Christopher Kurtz (United States)

Christopher Kurtz

Takuro Kuwata (Japan)

Takuro Kuwata

Jennifer Lee (United Kingdom)

Jennifer Lee

Deirdre McLoughlin (Ireland)

Deirdre McLoughlin

Richard McVetis (United Kingdom)

Richard McVetis

Simone Pheulpin (France)

Simone Pheulpin

Irina Razumovskaya (Russian Federation)

Irina Rezumovskaya

Aneta Regel (United Kingdom)

Aneta Regel

Ryuhei Sako (Japan)

Ryuhei Sako

Rita Soto (Chile)

Rita Soto

Laurenz Stockner (Italy)

Laurenz Stockner

Wycliffe Stutchbury (United Kingdom)

Wycliffe Stutchbury

Mercedes Vicente (Spain)

Mercedes Vicente

Julian Watts (United States)

Julian Watts

Takeshi Yasuda (United Kingdom)

Takeshi Yasuda

Ashley YK Yeo (Singapore)

Ashley YK Yeo

Shohei Yokoyama (Japan)

Shohei Yokoyama

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An exclusive look at Aphid’s AW18 collection

23.02.2018 | Blog , Fashion | BY:

London-based collective Aphid brings sharp, sculptural tailoring and avant-garde design to the contemporary scene. With a moody, darker feel, it’s all about embracing the strange and unfamiliar. Here the brand gives Twin an exclusive insight into their designs and thought process behind the AW18 collection.

Our AW18 collection is based around the idea of ‘RITUALS: Ceremony consisting of a series of actions performed according to a prescribed order.’  We love the notion of dressing for an occasion and the heavily debated topic of what ‘dressing-up’ looks like for a contemporary woman. This led us to a fascination with ceremonial dressing and Japanese men’s Hakama trousers, worn during ancient tea ceremonies. Dressing for ceremony; what it means and how it’s achieved for both men and women was an initial focal point for us. These tailored, oversized and heavily pleated ceremonial trousers really excited us, and we began deconstructing and re-invisioning these and other forms of traditional dress, how layering is used and the nature of formal dressing has evolved. The notion of suiting and ceremony was also at play in our thought process with the choice of grid print and surface texture. The linear formations playing with the hybrid/ intertwined idea of a pinstripe and the ritually raked ridges of a zen garden.

Linesaline Dress, Aphid AW18 | © Aphid

Colour-wise we wanted to combine the reflective and contemplative sensation that a dark, monochrome palette evokes with vivid, energising shades associated with celebratory clothing – a duality that we frequently return to. Colour isn’t something that we naturally lean towards and as such we won’t ever be a brand that takes colour lightly – for us these infusions of saturated brights punctuate the collection bring an interesting tension, allowing our constant canvas of monochrome tones to be refreshed and invigorated with a new perspective each season.

See more of the sketches for Aphid’s AW18 collection below.

Linesaline Dress, Aphid AW18 | © Aphid

Bilenta top and Glasson Trouser, Aphid’s AW18 collection | © Aphid

Peckton Blazer Osaka Trousers, Aphid AW18 | © Aphid

Braxton dress Aphid AW18 | © Aphid

Calucine Jumpsuit, Aphid AW18 | © Aphid

 

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Arthur Arbesser AW18

23.02.2018 | Fashion | BY:

Arthur Arbesser AW18 | © © Amber Pinkerton

Arthur Arbesser AW18 | © © Amber Pinkerton

Arthur Arbesser AW18 | © © Amber Pinkerton

Arthur Arbesser AW18 | © © Amber Pinkerton

Arthur Arbesser AW18 | © © Amber Pinkerton

Arthur Arbesser AW18 | © © Amber Pinkerton

Arthur Arbesser AW18 | © © Amber Pinkerton

Arthur Arbesser AW18 | © © Amber Pinkerton

Arthur Arbesser AW18 | © © Amber Pinkerton

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Behind the scenes at Preen AW18

23.02.2018 | Fashion | BY:

Amber Pinkerton goes behind the scenes at Preen to report on the best looks backstage.

Preen AW18 | © Amber Pinkerton

Preen AW18 | © Amber Pinkerton

Preen AW18 | © Amber Pinkerton

Preen AW18 | © Amber Pinkerton

Preen AW18 | © Amber Pinkerton

Preen AW18 | © Amber Pinkerton

Preen AW18 | © Amber Pinkerton

Preen AW18 | © Amber Pinkerton

Preen AW18 | © Amber Pinkerton

Preen AW18 | © Amber Pinkerton

Preen AW18 | © Amber Pinkerton

Preen AW18 | © Amber Pinkerton

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Shrimps AW18

21.02.2018 | Fashion | BY:

Photographer Sara Abdel Gadir reports from the Shrimps AW18 presentation at London Fashion Week.

Shrimps AW18 | © Sara Abdel Gadir

Shrimps AW18 | © Sara Abdel Gadir

Shrimps AW18 | © Sara Abdel Gadir

Shrimps AW18 | © Sara Abdel Gadir

Shrimps AW18 | © Sara Abdel Gadir

Shrimps AW18 | © Sara Abdel Gadir

Shrimps AW18 | © Sara Abdel Gadir

Shrimps AW18 | © Sara Abdel Gadir

Shrimps AW18 | © Sara Abdel Gadir

Shrimps AW18 | © Sara Abdel Gadir

Shrimps AW18 | © Sara Abdel Gadir

Shrimps AW18 | © Sara Abdel Gadir

Shrimps AW18 | © Sara Abdel Gadir

Shrimps AW18 | © Sara Abdel Gadir

Shrimps AW18 | © Sara Abdel Gadir

Shrimps AW18 | © Sara Abdel Gadir

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Margaret Howell AW18

21.02.2018 | Fashion | BY:

Maya Skelton goes behind the scenes at Margaret Howell’s AW18 presentation.

Margaret Howell AW18 | © Maya Skelton

Margaret Howell AW18 | © Maya Skelton

Margaret Howell AW18 | © Maya Skelton

Margaret Howell AW18 | © Maya Skelton

Margaret Howell AW18 | © Maya Skelton

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Backstage at Gareth Pugh AW18

21.02.2018 | Fashion | BY:

Amber Pinkerton goes backstage to delve into the theatrical, dystopian, violent and beautiful space that is Gareth Pugh’s ever enthralling imagination.

Gareth Pugh AW18 | © Amber Pinkerton

Gareth Pugh AW18 | © Amber Pinkerton

Gareth Pugh AW18 | © Amber Pinkerton

Gareth Pugh AW18 | © Amber Pinkerton

Gareth Pugh AW18 | © Amber Pinkerton

Gareth Pugh AW18 | © Amber Pinkerton

Gareth Pugh AW18 | © Amber Pinkerton

Gareth Pugh AW18 | © Amber Pinkerton

Gareth Pugh AW18 | © Amber Pinkerton

Gareth Pugh AW18 | © Amber Pinkerton

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Marta Jakubowski AW18

19.02.2018 | Fashion | BY:

Marta Jakubowski AW18 | Amber Pinkerton

Marta Jakubowski AW18 | Amber Pinkerton

Marta Jakubowski AW18 | Amber Pinkerton

Marta Jakubowski AW18 | Amber Pinkerton

Marta Jakubowski AW18 | Amber Pinkerton

Marta Jakubowski AW18 | Amber Pinkerton

Marta Jakubowski AW18 | Amber Pinkerton

Marta Jakubowski AW18 | Amber Pinkerton

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Obsessing over Wade’s world: Mimi Wade AW18

18.02.2018 | Blog , Fashion | BY:

It was a kind of mock-gothic, Hollywood bridal party that only Mimi Wade, with her proven aptitude for taking the fantastically kitsch and making it fantastically sexy, could have pulled off. For AW18, Wade ostensibly stripped back her signature aesthetic but managed to retain a raw, vamp-like glamour even while working across a monochrome base.

Part of a new generation of designers in London adept at creating clans – the likes of Molly Goddard and Sadie Williams have delivered a powerful, unifying aesthetic language too – Mimi Wade has established a strong identity for her women, mixing a sense of nonchalance (this season through bias cuts and frayed hems) with feline sultriness (velvet bows, ruched, deep collars and puffed sleeves). It’s Wade’s World, and we want in.

Mimi Wade AW18 | © Amber Pinkerton

Mimi Wade AW18 | © Amber Pinkerton

Mimi Wade AW18 | © Amber Pinkerton

Mimi Wade AW18 | © Amber Pinkerton

Mimi Wade AW18 | © Amber Pinkerton

Mimi Wade AW18 | © Amber Pinkerton

Mimi Wade AW18 | © Amber Pinkerton

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Fyodor Golan AW18

17.02.2018 | Fashion | BY:

Fyodor Golan AW18 | © Amber Pinkerton

Fyodor Golan AW18 | © Amber Pinkerton

Fyodor Golan AW18 | © Amber Pinkerton

Fyodor Golan AW18 | © Amber Pinkerton

Fyodor Golan AW18 | © Amber Pinkerton

Fyodor Golan AW18 | © Amber Pinkerton

Fyodor Golan AW18 | © Amber Pinkerton

Fyodor Golan AW18 | © Amber Pinkerton

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Ryan Lo AW18

17.02.2018 | Fashion | BY:

Ryan Lo AW18 | © Maya Skelton

Ryan Lo AW18 | © Maya Skelton

Ryan Lo AW18 | © Maya Skelton

Ryan Lo AW18 | © Maya Skelton

Ryan Lo AW18 | © Maya Skelton

Ryan Lo AW18 | © Maya Skelton

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Richard Malone AW18

16.02.2018 | Fashion | BY:

Richard Malone AW18 | © Amber Pinkerton

Richard Malone AW18 | © Amber Pinkerton

Richard Malone AW18 | © Amber Pinkerton

Richard Malone AW18 | © Amber Pinkerton

Richard Malone AW18 | © Amber Pinkerton

Richard Malone AW18 | © Amber Pinkerton

Richard Malone AW18 | © Amber Pinkerton

Richard Malone AW18 | © Amber Pinkerton

 

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Juno Calypso opens ‘The Salon’ in London

15.02.2018 | Art , Culture | BY:

Offering a dystopian and uneasy version of a salon the day after Valentines perfectly communicates the vision at the heart of Juno Calypso’s work. The new multi-sensory installation in Melissa Galeria space in Covent Garden is full of stark red light and casts of mannequins, offering a space that feels weird and uncomfortable. The subversion and play are recurring themes in Calypso’s work, who often works with mask, costume and theatrical stagings to explore ideas of femininity and sexuality.

Open from today, the installation will run until April, offering ample time to wholly immersive yourself in Calypso’s unsettling and compelling world.

Animation by Geriko | Juno Calypso exhibition in London

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Coach Fall 2018: a dreamer bag and dreamier collection

14.02.2018 | Fashion | BY:

Stuart Vevers presented his Fall 2018 collection for Coach, bringing a splicing of American gothic and the New York underground scene together in one dreamy show.

With an abundance of textures, talismans, mixed silhouettes and heavy accessories, the show offered a rich and atmospheric vision for modern life. Fall 2018 also saw the introduction of Coach’s Dreamer Bag, inspired by romanticism and how it manifests in New York. Check out more from the collection below.

London Fashion Week Designers to Watch AW18

13.02.2018 | Blog , Fashion | BY:

As London Fashion Week approaches, there are plenty of new names to watch out for. Meet four designers setting a new agenda for the British womenswear scene this season.

Matty Bovan

A Fashion East graduate and Charles Jeffrey contemporary, Matty Bovan is staging his first standalone womenswear show at London Fashion Week this season. His designs evoke an underground utopia, leveraging clashing textures, prints and colours to create a raw and powerful new kind of tribe. A nominee for British Emerging Womenswear Talent at the Fashion Awards 2017, all eyes will be on where Bovan is going next.

Sadie Williams

Having already been listed as one of  Forbes Magazine’s “30 Under 30” for The Arts in Europe as well as a host of other accolades and NEWGEN sponsorship, Sadie Williams has the industry talking. Her unique designs combine folk sensibility with futuristic patterns and materials, rendering a new kind of woman that is empowered, playful and adventurous.

© Sadie Williams

Paula Knorr

This London designer is making waves with her sexy, disco-inspired aesthetic that boldly reclaims femininity and offers a fiery new interpretation. Working across a myriad of high energy fabrics and in bold, powerful shades Paula Knorr‘s designs make you want to stand up and make some noise. Read our interview with the designer here.

© Paula Knorr

Marta Jakubowski

Another recipient of the NEWGEN award this year, Marta Jakubowski offers a refined and confident vision through her bright and precisely tailored pieces. Easily re-imagining familiar staples in new ways, Jakubowski’s geometric tailoring brings fresh energy to womenswear and sets an exciting precedent for a new aesthetic in seasons to come.

© Marta Jakubowski

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Arcades, escapism and English breakfasts: Alexa Chung’s ‘Fantastic’

06.02.2018 | Culture , Fashion | BY:

A new video from Alexa Chung, directed by Jesse Jenkins, evokes the magic and nostalgia of the British seaside. Starting with a laconic reading of a John Cooper-Clarke’s poem ‘I Mustn’t Go Down To The Sea Again’ the visuals introduce a lonely dancer, spinning on the beach between cliffs. As the boy, dressed in a mustard corduroy suit, explores along the promenade, he discovers the ‘fantastic’ venue, and the allure of the glitter and musical magic inside – a gathering of women dressed in pink satin dresses and striped shirts.

“I think I’m always intrigued by that stage of youth where you’re caught in between teenagedom and adulthood.” Said Alexa Chung, creative director of her eponymous brand, of the video. “There’s a synergy between what’s going on in the video: finding one’s place in the world, tentative expression, the joy of discovery and what’s going on with our brand. Progressively feeling more confident. Britpop largely inspired this collection and that sort of ultra-British experience of soggy chips and windswept beaches and old men’s pubs and disco revivals is a time and a place I wanted to revisit in this film.”

A tribute to the joy of discovery and the energising power of music, this is the kind of romantic escapism that’s perfect for starting the week.

ALEXA CHUNG “FANTASTIC” from Jesse John Jenkins on Vimeo.

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