Louis Vuitton AW18 brings a new vision for strong women

07.03.2018 | Blog , Fashion | BY:

Military yet undone, matching but out of synch, the Louis Vuitton AW18 show brought to life a new vision of powerful women. The show was all about turning the expected on its head, and there was a palpable sense of strangeness and mystery throughout. Bags were carried on their sides, rather than upright; eye make-up streaked across one eye but left the other bare; traditional silhouettes such as pencil skirts and cashmere polo necks were mixed with peplum leather jackets and suede-shouldered pale yellow, shearling jackets. It was Nicolas Ghesquiere at his savviest, blending femininity and power to offer an original vision. Here’s to the new era.

Louis Vuitton AW18

Louis Vuitton AW18

Louis Vuitton AW18

Louis Vuitton AW18

Louis Vuitton AW18

Louis Vuitton AW18


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Harriet Horton’s Camouflage

29.09.2016 | Art | BY:

Harriet Horton is heading to Paris. But not before she lets UK-based fans of her brand of taxidermy take a look at the new collection – ‘Camouflage’ – at her London studio.

Having beens fans of Harriet’s work for some time now, firstly becoming enamoured with her ‘Sleep Subjects’ exhibition of 2015, Twin is excited to see such an exciting and irreverent artist continue to develop.

Harriet Horton

Harriet Horton, Owen, 2016

For 2016 the signature neons are still gleefully present, but there is a new, multi-textured element to the works. Materials such as marble dust and cement have been introduced, and create a staggering contrast to the exquisite delicacy of the taxidermy itself, transcending each piece onto an almost angelic plane.

“I’ve always said that when animals are deceased their natural colouring and camouflage becomes redundant,” Horton explains. “I have explored this idea further [for ‘Camouflage’] by either using animals that have no existing markings or stripping them of their original colouring and reconstructing it with light.”

It is fitting then, that a city such as Paris, which is so often known for both its light and its love, should be host to such a stunning example of the two used to breathtaking effect. Unmissable beauty.

‘Camouflage’ opens at the mi* gallery in Paris on 26th October, and runs until 16th January 2017.

Harriet will be holding a private view of the new work at her studio, Darnley Road Studios, on 29th September.


Main image: Harriet Horton, Lovers, 2016

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Dior Reimagines Couture For SS16

28.01.2016 | Fashion | BY:

Haute couture isn’t something that’s typically thought of as cool. Beautiful? Yes. Incredibly intricate, ostentatiously unique and mind-blowingly accomplished? Yes. Rebellious? Absolutely. But cool? No. Well, turns out, someone didn’t give the seven-strong team behind Christian Dior‘s spring summer 2016 collection that memo.

What was presented to a predictably packed audience in Paris’s Musée Rodin on Monday was as deliciously unkempt as the bookshelves lining the Seine. Despite the departure of Raf Simons – the undoubtedly refreshing and oft-lauded face of modernity at the historic French house – this was a collection of magnificently wearable, works of art.

Starchy silhouettes were compromised with flashes of bare shoulder – not in a calculated ‘cut-out’ manner – but as if the model had been gesticulating too wildly and somehow shrugged one side of her previously ladylike look off. Because of course Dior is ladylike. Even when it’s sending punkish sheer tops layered underneath prom dresses down the catwalk, the hair remains in a perfect side part, and the cheeks delicately rouged.


Christian Dior Haute Couture SS16

In addition to this, hemlines of voluminous silk dresses cascaded messily from beneath embroidered, tobacco-hued wool coats that were just that bit too short, and the breast-plate of stiff tops exploded provocatively in a fanning wave of ruffles around models’ décolletage.

There is no denying that haute couture as a whole, has become infinitely more realistic in its approach to cut and day-to-day use in recent years. Even the handful of super rich clients who buy this stuff have some kind of ‘cost per wear’ gauge. But – that doesn’t mean it’s become boring. Far from it. In fact, the true inventiveness now is in the attitude conveyed by the most beautiful of clothes. As Christian Dior themselves echoed in their statement this week:

“The spontaneous, relaxed Parisienne of today is Couture by nature, down to the smallest details, but modern in spirit. It’s her attitude, her way of moving, her way of simply being.”


Christian Dior Haute Couture SS16


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Parlez Vous Francais?

08.04.2014 | Fashion | BY:

Recently, Twin crossed the channel and headed to the French capital to find out what’s hot in Paris right now. Between walking along Avenue Montaigne, shopping at Colette and eating macaroons at Angelina, we met with some emerging designers at their showrooms to find out about the AW14 collections. Now if you’ve not heard of these three brands before, take note.

Etienne Dereoux

Etienne Dereoux states that he doesn’t necessarily create with seasons in mind. Everything is more resortwear; “winter under the sun” if you will, and with the bright pink and blue hues his latest collection boasts, spending your time by the fire would be a complete waste of his garments. Dereoux studied fashion at the Antwerp Academy of Fine Arts and La Cambre School of Visual Arts before starting his eponymous label in Paris. There is a certain serenity to his pieces, fusing comfort and elegance in a contemporary sportswear fashion.

For AW14 a mix of vivid colours like bright fuchsia and royal blue are complemented by black and white and find themselves decorating clean-cut bomber jackets, wool cashmere coats, soft honeycomb knits or crocodile leather pieces. We were specifically drawn to his knitwear capsule collection, a collaboration with the heritage brand Le Mont Saint-Michel. Inspired by dance attire, the range includes mesh-like jumpers and fully- fashioned merino dresses that perfectly combine French savoir-faire and American-inspired sportswear. It’s a match made in fashion heaven.



Now you might not know the name, but you’ve certainly seen his designs before. As Head Knitwear Designer for Kenzo, Risto Bimbiloski is no newcomer to the fashion scene having previously worked at Jean Colonna, Thierry Mugler and Louis Vuitton. His personal label is inspired by science and technology giving us quirky motifs and intricate pieces that push the boundaries of knitwear entirely. A family affair, the brand’s collections are entirely produced by Risto’s own atelier, run by his mother in Macedonia and at his showroom we met his brother too. The Macedonian designer is also influenced by the traditional artisan techniques of the women in Ohrid, his hometown, so it’s safe to say this creative hasn’t forgotten his roots.

Come winter, the Risto girl will be seen in light green metallic dresses, high-waisted loose-fitting tailored pants in varied shades, and of course an array of knitted pieces from polo necks, cropped woven jumpers and cardigans covered in wool fringing.



The Calla brand is international to say the least. Based in Paris, showing as part of Made in New York and Calla Haynes, the designer herself is Canadian, which gives the collections this nomadic essence; they won’t feel out of place anywhere. Even the materials are international, boasting silky lightweight fabrics from Japan and mohair from Italy.

Calla likes to create a story for her collections, delving deep into a narrative that expresses each season. For AW14 the Calla girl is a broken-hearted Parisian who ups and leaves for Memphis to become a country singer. This elaborate tale helped create the varsity jackets, oversized blazers, dresses and skirts the collection is full of. The chunky alpaca knits and mohair plaid are a nod to traditional Americana and provide the perfect juxtaposition of tomboy and feminine that the brand is known for. There was also many more graphic prints than previous seasons. One, is based on Lillybear, Calla’s fluffy companion, a Chow Chow who we met while she guarded the showroom. The Lilly motif finds itself emblazed on sweaters, cardigans, dresses, trousers and coats, in an array of colourways. It’s this fun and light-hearted take on fashion that leaves a smile on your face when wearing Calla.


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Astralis at Louis Vuitton

12.02.2014 | Art | BY:

Astralis is the 23rd exhibition to be held at Espace Culturel Louis Vuitton in Paris. The exhibit claims to “take visitors on a journey into this strange reality by exploring unfathomable and inaccessible worlds.” Taking it’s name from ‘Astral’, another term for ‘invisible,’ this contemporary exhibition explores the relationship between art and the many forms of the invisible: from astrophysics to cognitive science and alternative knowledge, not to mention unexplained phenomena linked to a variety of visionary or metaphysical dimensions.

Including work from a dozen international artists, l’Espace Culturel Louis Vuitton is also organising a series of unique events to run alongside Astralis. Conversations and performances, youth workshops and weekend family activities are all ways to get involved with the exhibit. Running from now until May 11th, there’s more than enough time to get lost in space.

To find out more and check for activity dates go to louisvuitton-espaceculturel.com

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The Haute Roundup

27.01.2012 | Blog , Fashion | BY:

Yesterday marked the end of the Spring/Summer 2012 couture shows. The proverbial creme de la creme of fashion, only allowed to show during this three-day short Fashion Week through a Chambre Syndicale De La Haute Couture membership – haute couture doesn’t mean high dressmaking in French for nothing – showed a degree of craftsmanship and attention to detail all across the fashion spectrum.

Twin recounts our haute couture highlights from Paris…

Alexis Mabille

Proving that haute couture doesn’t have to keep to a demure palette, Mabille punched up the colour factor with his neon designs. Inspired by photographs of Lisa Fonssagrives and Christy Turlington, the creations in fabrics ranging from metallic lame to guipure lace proved that even when it comes to couture, girls just want to have fun.

Bouchra Jarrar

Working with crepe de soie, fur collars and wide-legged tailored trousers, Jarrar’s collection was a take on casual luxe. A bit of tomboy and a dash of urban sophisticate resulted in a whole lot of effortless cool.


No couture week is complete without Karl Lagerfeld’s latest mind musings. Taking the double Cs to a more ethereal place this time around (airplane runway, anyone?) resulted in a collection of beautifully hand-embellished pieces in icy blues, ivories and midnight blacks.

Elie Saab

Elie Saab is the go-to designer for anything feminine and delicate, and this season was no exception. Lace and crystal embroidery on nude, pastel pink and pale lemon high-waisted dresses and A-line skirts made being a woman that bit more enticing.

Giambattista Valli

It may only be Valli’s second showing on the haute couture circuit, but the Italian designer proves that he can hold his own among fashion’s heavyweights. With a plethora of expertly tailored feather, lace and embroidered pieces, he’s as couture as they come.

Jean Paul Gaultier

In a beehive and winged eyeliner tribute to Amy Winehouse, Gaultier sent out a collection that was every bit as eccentric and nonchalant as the late singer herself. Encompassing pieces such as back to black shirt-tail hem skirts, leather varsity jackets and silk kimono coats tied at the waist, Winehouse probably wouldn’t have wanted her couture any other way.

Maison Martin Margiela Artisanal

Leave it to the house of Margiela to put an unconventional spin on couture. Rope, braided bracelets and hundreds of pearlescent buttons were turned into  knee-length trench coats, colourful micro dresses, and slouchy blazer and pegged trouser combos, proving that recycled fashion doesn’t have to be drab.


It has only taken a few seasons for Pier Paolo Piccioli and Maria Grazia Chiuri to fully establish their trademark of girlish and graceful designs at Valentino. Marking a sweet end to haute couture fashion week, this collection of chiffon, lace and tulle in fine floral prints had a glamourised Charlotte Brontë/Jane Austen novel feel to it. Piccioli and Chiuri clearly have a talent for capturing fashion daydreams.

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Mom & Dad

07.11.2011 | Art , Blog | BY:

Terry Richardson’s images are conventionally imbued with a heavy dollop of sex and fun so it is refreshing to see him turn his lens to a more sober topic: that of his parents’ divorce. “My parents split up when I was four. It feels good for me to have them back together again, even if it’s in a gallery and only for a little while. It’s something I’m doing for me and in a way, for them.” -Terry Richardson, 2011

Having launched his two-volume publication MOM DAD at cult Paris store Colette, this month sees the accompanying exhibition head to New York’s Half Gallery.

His father Bob Richardson was a renowned fashion photographer while his mother Annie, currently living in Ojai, California, is a former Copacabana dancer and stylist. Their early divorce is irrelevant in Richardson’s NYC exhibition: hung side by side their portraits, as well as written works relating to his parents, see them reunited. Moving yet funny, in bringing his mom and dad back together Richardson attempts to reconcile not only his parents’ marriage, but his own origins and understanding of self.

Published by Morel Books

From 11th November until 4th December 2011 at Half Gallery, 208 Forsyth Street, New York.

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Northern exposure

07.06.2011 | Art , Blog | BY:

Photographer Lina Scheynius delves into her past for her third book, 03, to a time when her photographs were intended for her eyes only.

While Scheynius is increasingly in demand as a fashion photographer, her personal photographs are, in contrast, a hypnotic hymn to sex, love and uninhibited freedom. Although the photographer’s previous books have been visual diaries detailing her recent life between London, Paris and Sweden, this time around she’s compiled a book of images taken between 1991, when she was just ten-years-old, and early 2007, just before her first magazine commission.

It’s an embryonic collection of pictures, revealing the same ethereal beauty, light and intimacy for which she has become known.  Another chapter in her book of life.

Lina Scheynius’ 03 is available here

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