“The Invisibles” by i-D & Jermaine Francis

Next week , photographer Jermaine Francis in collaboration with i-D will present an exhibition titled “The Invisibles.” The expo is a documentary of  London’s Homeless crisis through the photography of tents that serve as temporary homeless shelters around the city. 

Francis initially began shooting this project a few months ago and had the final project — The Invisibles featured in i-D’s most recent issue. 

“I didn’t enjoy making this project. About a year ago, I began noticing tents popping up around the urban landscape. I already knew that homelessness had increased and increased everywhere, not just in London — but the tents cemented it. Research from Shelter has revealed that there are about 300, 000 homeless people in the UK, an increase of 13, 000 in the past year alone . This means that one in every 200 people in Britain are homeless. If you add in those who are unrecorded, or sleeping two and three to one tent, that number is even higher. 

It felt strange seeing so many homeless people living in tents here in Britain; we’re the fifth largest economy in the world. This is a place that’s supposed to be able to help the most vulnerable in our society. I decided to document them,”  the photographer wrote in an article about the project. 

In addition to Jermaine’s photography, there exhibition will also include an auction of work from artists such as Robi Rodriguez, Lena C Emery, Mel Bles, Vinca Peters and others. All of whose proceeds from the draw will go towards supporting charities such as Shelter’s Home Team &  Family Support Service.

“The Invisibles” will take place on the 23rd of October at Protein Studios 31, from 6-9pm.

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Fashion Film Festival Milan presents edition NO.6

Cover Image: Still from Kenzo Memento by Thomas Traum

In a few weeks, the annual Fashion Film Festival Milano will present its sixth edition of screening since its establishment by Costanza Cavalli Etro five years ago. Set to take place from November 7th – 10th, at the Anteo Palazzo del Cinema, the festival will showcase a selection of 200 films from over 50 countries divided by curator Gloria Maria Cappelletti into categories under themes such as feminism, social diversity & inclusion, and environmental sustainability. 

From this selection of 200 films, the festival’s jury will be tasked to select winners for 16 categories including Best Fashion Film, Best Director, Best Green Fashion Film and the newly added category of Best New Italian Designer/Brand. The association has also partnered with Istituto Marangoni on The Gaze of The Future Fashion Film Contest, which will set an evening for the screening of films by emerging talents as well as a conversation, giving advice on pursuing a career in the industries as a young creative.

This year’s jury is lead by Giorgio Armani, and features fashion and art industry executives such as photographer Cass Bird; founder of Brazilian brand Osklen, Oskar Metsavaht; top model and human rights activist Waris Dirie; founder and creative director of Petronio Associates Ezra Petronio; actress, creator and producer Cristiana Captondi; Artistic Director of Pirelli HangarBicocca Vicente Todoli; Fashion Critic Angelo Flaccavento and Vogue Japan Editor-at-large Sissy Vian.  

Apart from the screening of films, additional festivities will also include conversations discussing topics such as Independent Publishing from a Female Point of View and issues surrounding female rights and female genital mutilation and a special screening of The Times of Bill Cunningham — a film directed by Mark Bozek honouring the memory of the later fashion photographer Bill Cunningham. The four day event will then conclude with the Italian premiere of Peter Lindbergh: Women’s Stories, a film directed by Jean-Michel Vecchiet documenting some of the works of the iconic fashion designer who recently passed away while some of his muses including Naomi Campbell, Astrid Lindbergh, and Helga Polzin discuss his legacy. For more information about the festival visit Fashion Film Festival Milano.

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Marni Pop Folk Market

Last April during Milan Design Week, Italian brand Marni presented a line of bags, furniture and design objects in their signature show space. 

This week the brand has finally put these objects on sale via what they dub their online Pop Folk Market. With a series of colour combinations featuring their Crochet bags (in cotton & wool) , Hammock Bags,  iconic striped bag and an introduction of their Fish Bag in a fluorescent shade, the house has created a visual story as they embark on a road trip filled with the characteristics of colour, humour and personality. Each of the pieces included in the collection is said to be a unique creation handcrafted by their long term Columbian artisans using the meticulous artisanal process of the local traditions. All the pieces from Marni Pop Folk Market are currently available at Marni.com

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A chat with Julie De Libran on her Matches Fashion collaboration

Julie De Libran is a French designer known for her work leading design houses like Prada, Versace and Louis Vuitton. Her speciality has always been the craft of creating unique made-to-measure womenswear pieces that allowed the wearer to feel a level of individual elegance. On her latest venture, De Libran has partnered with London based luxury retailer Matches Fashion on the launch of an inaugural collection. The collection, which marks the launch of her brand, includes a line of red-carpet gowns made from limited edition archive fabrics. Each gown was given a name of the different female personalities who inspired them including Sofia, Charly, Brigette , Gaia, Gilda, Julia, Jones, Blue Bird, Alexia, Martine, Eve and Nancy. 

The designer worked in collaboration with Matches Fashion to create 7 ready to wear pieces and 7 made-to-measure dresses which will be specially created for each client. On the occasion of the launch, Twin had the chance to have a quick chat with the designer about her latest collection. 

Would you call yourself a feminist in some way? 

No , I am a woman, I respect women and I am inspired by women. I am a feminist like all women without the political connotation. 

Each dress in the collection has a name/story, what is it the general idea of each of the names ? What do they mean to you? 

Each name is a person that inspires me she is real or made up. I like designing for women thinking of where they are going, what they like, their passions, their character and how a dress can influence this character or be a character of its own. 

Why did you think evening wear was the best vessel to tell these stories?

I feel a dress is something you cherish it’s one piece you can put on and you are dressed. You can dress it up or dress it down depending on your accessories. It’s timeless, it’s a memory of an important moment like listening to a piece of music that is full of memories. 

What percentage of the fabric used from this collection was recycled ? 

More than 60 percent the rest are made from limited embroidered materials made to measure so only made when ordered without waste. 

What do you hope for a client when they purchase and wear one of these dresses ?

I hope she feels comfort, freedom of movement, elegance, strength, feels it’s timeless, will cherish her dress and then pass it down to the next generation. 

Julie De Libran’s collection is now available online Matches Fashion

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Mixed Feelings – an exploration of the impact of our digital habits , a chat with author Naomi Shimada

Social media is the most powerful, disruptive and exciting tool to have come into the world in the last decade. It’s role in our lives has drastically changed too, as we lean into its complex system of absorbing information, embracing likes, tracking follows and sharing bits of ourselves.

Two people extremely well placed to grapple with the complexities of this landscape are Naomi Shimada and Sarah Raphael. Having both grown with the internet,  and felt the power and possibilities that the digital landscape presented, they’ve distilled their thoughts and experiences into a new book, Mixed Feelings. Bringing together diverse voices and ideas, the result is an insightful take on the most pressing issue of our time. How do we live together, openly, imperfectly and harmoniously in this digital age? 

We caught up with Naomi Shimada to discuss their work. 

Why did it feel like now was the time to write Mixed Feelings?

We were feeling this overwhelming sense that this conversation needed to happen on a larger scale. For millennials, the internet and social media are the things that affected our lives in the biggest way. It’s changed the way we work, love, travel, exercise, eat! It’s drastically changed how we live and there’s bound to be some fallout because of that. The fallout is mostly an emotional one.  To have a smartphone and be using social media almost undoubtedly means you have mixed feelings about it. There is this overwhelming feeling I can feel in the air and see in peoples’ eyes that things can’t go on like this as they are. Everyone we spoke to, so many conversations I overheard, wherever I went in the world, someone was talking about something that happened via social media, where it’s something they saw or did themselves that made them feel some type of way!

 How have your relationships with social media changed since you started  using it?

More than anything I’m more conscious of how I try to manage my time on it. I know when I want to be quiet and when I feel like being more active. I’m more aware of the feelings it triggers and try to give myself what I need. Also I feel less affected by the pedestal culture it can often create. There are so many things we can’t see in a photo, I really understand now that just because something looks good, doesn’t mean it is good. And it’s been a good reminder that we shouldn’t all be yearning after the same things in life, success shouldn’t look formulaic to all of us. We are all on different paths and it’s important to remember that amid everything we see on social media. 

Do you feel like it’s possible to have a naive / carefree relationship with social media today, or does it have to be conscious and curated?

I think that question is more a lot to do with who you are as person and what you’re using social media for! I think if you use it mainly for work or as a portfolio etc than probably using it in a more curated way makes sense for you. I’m all about doing what you feel is best for you!

How do you think social media impacts our friendships and relationships in real life, for the better, and for the worse?

I don’t think it’s black and white like that. It’s been a super powerful tool for connecting with people for me. Some of those digital connections have turned into some of my deepest IRL friendships so I definitely don’t discount the power of a relationship that starts online, but it can be confusing sometimes when social media is so made to be so much about social capital. We can also use our profiles to curate and create a version of ourselves that doesn’t necessarily mirror who are in real life and that’s tricky terrain to navigate. We are also a generation that has so many aquaintances and less deep friendships. I think just being aware of what kind of friendships you want and what kind of friend you are or want to be to others online as well as in real life is a grounding place to start. 

What has been the most exciting thing about creating this book for you both?

It’s been really powerful to just create a space to have and try to encourage really honest and vulnerable conversations. Social media is so often a place of pretence and projection, so we wanted to make something that was the antithesis of that. We wanted to make something that you had to put your phone down to absorb and think and sit with. 

What was the biggest learning / take away from the process of creating the book?

That even though our book was focused on our emotional habits around social media, what we were really writing about, was the human condition. That all of these complexities that we’re talking about, all these feelings, are innately human but are just amplified by social media! 

Although it’s entitled mixed feelings, is there a clear takeaway that you want to leave readers with?

That you aren’t alone in these feelings. This technology in the grand scheme of things is so new we don’t really understand what it’s doing to our brains yet, as we don’t have the research. We don’t pretend to have the answers but we’re hoping by sharing our experiences it makes other people feel more free and less ashamed about these feelings we so often feel in isolation, alone on our phones. Let’s just be honest and agree that so much of how social media makes us feel and make us do – is weird man! 

Based on what people have contributed to the book and your own thinking, do you think our relationship with social media is going to change any time soon?

I don’t think this technology is going anywhere, our lives are only becoming more and more intertwined. These apps are designed to make us addicted, and the more time we spend on them the more tech companies can gain from us financially. So if we want the internet and social media to change, we have to change. We have to be more aware about how things make us feel and from then decide what kind of role you want it to keep playing in your life. If we want it to grow up we have to grow up ourselves.

 Mixed Feelings: Exploring the Emotional Impact of our Digital Habits by Naomi Shimada & Sarah Raphael (Quadrille, £16.99) is out now 

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The Woven Exhibitionist by MWoven & Peter Tomaszewicz

Recently, London based sustainable fashion brand MWoven  by Martina Spetlova joined forces with motion graphics director Peter Tomaszewicz on the creation of an interesting short film titled “The Woven Exhibitionist.” The film is an exploration of the possibilities of hyperreal surrealism with a direct focus on colourful outbursts of shapes and spaces. The creatives’ intentions were to create a film that would evoke pleasant feelings of suspense, all while exploring the designer’s signature weaving techniques that come with an added touch of arms sensations. 

It begins in a minimal ambiguous space, an then further continues to reveal the unexpected artistry behind the techniques using colour and shapes. 

“The project includes reflections of the unseen, inflatable articles, liquid forms and unexpected movements that would transition the viewer with the guidance of the vigorous sound to the routes of “The Tree Of Woven”, an archetype of a paradise in which these objects represent the pinnacle of innovation and ultimate desire,” read the press release. View the full video below.

Motion design director – Peter Tomaszewicz

MWoven designer – Martina Spetlova

Sound – Austin from Snapped Ankles

Production and communications director – Christiana Perdiou

Digital textile assets by FBFX Digital:

Photogrammetry – Jack Rothwell

PBR Texture Creation – Anastasiya Honchar

Zbrush Artist – Chris Everritt

3D Artist – Giovanni Manili

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Rihanna set to release visual autobiography

In the world of pop culture, Rihanna is one of the three names that sits on the thrones of the holy trinity of modern day female music, alongside Beyoncé and Nicki Minaj. 

The Bajan singer’s story is one known and celebrated by many: having officially moved from Barbados to the US at just the age of 17, she soon signed with Def Jam Recordings and released her first hit single Pon De Replay as a part of her debut album Music of The Sun (2005), and the rest was history. Since then the artist’s image has gradually evolved and she has managed to keep the attention of the public as we all watched in fascination, as she transformed into the Good Girl Gone Bad (2007) with singles like Umbrella and not long after officially established her status as a sex symbol with songs like We Found Love from her album Talk That Talk. Today the artist is a proud recipient of 9 Grammy Awards , 12 Billboard Music Awards, 6 Guinness World Record and many others, and is the owner of billion dollar fashion operations like Fenty Beauty & Savage X Fenty. 

All of this journey and much more is set to be documented with intimate moments from her life and creative journey in the artist’s first visual autobiography published by Austrian publisher Phaidon Press. With 504 pages and over 1,000 images that include shots from her childhood in Barbados, to intimate family moments, iconic fashion moments and worldwide tours, the 15 pound book portrays the artist as the musician, performer, designer and entrepreneur we know and love. 

“I am so excited to share this collection of incredible images. I’m very grateful to the talented photographers and artists who contributed. We’ve been working on the book for over five years and I’m really happy to be able to finally share it with everybody,” commented Rihanna. 

The book will officially be released on October 24th, and will also be available in three luxury editions as a collaboration with artists The Haas Brothers: “This Sh*t Heavy” that will include a custom designed bookstand inspired by Rihanna’s hands; The Luxury Supreme Edition (already sold out) that has been signed by Rihanna, includes a special matte black book cover and a specially designed 18-carat gold coloured bookstand; and The Ultra Luxury Supreme edition (already sold out) includes the special matte black cover and a custom marble bookstand.  Secure your copy at TheRihannaBook.com

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Jamea Richmond-Edwards presents Prom Night at the Kravets Wehby Gallery

Cover Image : Fly Whips and Fly Girls, 2019

We all know of the commemorative event that signals towards the end of teen hood as being high school prom night. If we haven’t witnessed it first hand, then we’ve lived vicariously through the likes of films as old as Grease or as recent as High School Musical. But why is it that this event is such a milestone ?  

Later this month, New York based gallery Kravets Wehby will present an exhibition by American artist Jamea Richmond-Edwards that gives interesting insight on the momental event as a ritual for black American teenagers.

 Opening on October 17th , the artist will take her audience on a visual journey of paintings as she explores the question of why prom is such a right-of-passage for Black America.  Each of the artist’s paintings tells a story that hints to the bilateral perspectives surrounding the event. In her piece “Fly Whips and Fly Girls,” she depicts two prom goers posed against their cars ( a photo op. that has become somewhat of a staple on prom night ), implying a sense of autonomy. In another painting, “Seated Girl on Serpent Thrown with Stink Pink Gators,” Richmond-Edwards nods in references to her Southeastern American heritage through the girl’s pink alligator boots. Each painting tells a different story and offers an elevated perspective of the event that has become the norm so much so that we barely even think about it , through the eyes of black America. 

If in New York, this exhibition is not one to miss, and will run until November 16th. For more information , visit Kravets Wehby.

Slow Dance with Big Chief, 2019
The Prettiest Dress, 2019
Seated Girl on Serpent Throne with Stink Pink Gators, 2019

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PRADA Mode docks in London

Last week during Frieze London , Prada presented its third edition of Prada Mode  — a traveling private club with a focus on contemporary culture that provides members a unique art experience along with music, dining and conversation —  with the theme of Collective Intimacy in the heart of  London at the 180 The Strand as a collaboration with The Vinyl Factory and The Showroom . In a space installed by installation artist Theaster Gates,  the fashion house presented a series of exhibitions, performances and events across the span of a few days.  

This included panel discussions with names like designers Grace Wales Bonner & Dozie Kanu,  live performances by Samuel Ross, Bumi Thomas, poet Inua Ellams and a closing party with live performances by Jojo About and DJ sets by Zezi Ifore & James Messiah.

The event was the house’s second staging of Prada Mode this year following their set up at Art Basel Hong Kong in March. 

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FENDI AW19 x Rob Raco

 Last season Riverdale star Rob Raco graced Italian fashion house Fendi’s Spring Summer ’19 campaign and this season he returns once more to be the focal point of their latest AW19 men’s eyewear campaign.  In a short film, the Fendi ambassador is shot taking a ride through London’s Richmond Park , completely decked out in his Fendi AW19 gear while sporting sunglasses from the collection including the Futuristic FENDI, FENDI Glass and the FF FENDI. 

For more info on the latest collection visit FENDI.com 

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Twin Issue XXI

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For issue 21, Twin goes into the wild. Nature is all around this issue: raw, textured, free. We’re putting the spotlight on the untamed and the unconstrained, and within that, the figures who seize it, own it and make others want to do the same. 

Take the 8 groundbreaking artists, (Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, Njideka Akunyili Crosby, Renate Bertlmann, Pauline Boudry / Renate Lorenz, Laure Prouvost, Otobong Nkanga Eva Rothschild and  Cathy Wilkes) at this year’s Venice Biennale whose diverse and brilliant work sets a new agenda for representation in the art world. Also blazing a new path in the creative landscape is Mira Schor. The artist’s exhibition in New York earlier this year spotlighted on her Californian paintings, where, Kate Neave explains in her tribute Schor’s work, “Naked bodies live alongside wild beasts in exotic, luscious landscapes.”  

Wild beasts and a startling, evocative landscape is also the subject of Mark Mahaney’s ‘Polar Night’ series – a captivating meditation on the Alaskan town of Utqiagvik that sees 65 days of prolonged darkness each winter. Humans in nature, and the symbiotic relationship between the two is also explored through the collaboration between Rose Pilkington and photography duo Lola + Pani. Another to embrace the natural world is Natalie Mering (AKA Weyes Blood). The Pennsylvania-born star brings seventies sounds to modern ears, with well suited swagger, and talks over her new album with Liv Siddall. Meanwhile  photographer Daisy Walker and artist Alexandria Coe embrace living bodies through a dialogue of flesh and image.  

Powerful and visionary voices are celebrated throughout the issue. From Fran Gavin’s chat with the enigmatic and supreme talent, Turner nominee Anthea Hamilton to Lara Johnson Wheeler’s trans Atlantic email exchange with author Natasha Stagg; Melanie Gaydos, photographed by Ivar Wigan, speaks on beauty and bravery with Isabella Davey, and photographers Francesca Allen, Nicolas Kantor, Ronan McKenzie, Benjamin Vnuk and Emma Tempest bring their unique and energetic eyes to tell stories of individual, no shits to give, commanding, brilliant women.

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A Deeper Look(Book): Emma Charles SS20

What’s in a name. Namely, what’s in an Emma Charles Lady Gwen?

The young London designer has been crafting her signature style for the last three years, one of the key brands focussing on the move from the millennial IT bag to the Generation X preference for the sweet spot price point – a bag that delivers big on directional design and construction, at a price that satisfies predominant freelance pockets while not scrimping on the wow factor or the work/play/bar/dinner expectations a bag needs to fulfil.

Her signature style, the Lady Gwen, is like the prettiest fortune cookie you ever saw. Served in a seasonal selection of colours, always on the discretionary scale, the unique shape gives Emma the head start over her competitors for something that is immediately recognisable to its creator. 

With a slew of bag brands popping up, as audiences look for the underground name they can pioneer, rather than the monster fashion house design they can wield, Emma is on to a good thing: with an intimate range of luxury stockists, we called it first. 

Her clothing range, lesser known, is no less worthy of a second look. Drapery and embellishment is key, but much like her bags, it is done in a delicate manner: a plume of marabou feathering on the shoulders of a black blazer; a constellation of modern studs on a bag. 

Emma’s colour palette is always delightful, matching discretionary tones with shots of zesty greens or blushing pinks. 

As she works to expand her handbag offering, Emma shows she is still a designer finding her feet. Formulas have occurred in seasons that have not made the cut for the next. This is good to have this time for exploration – as when it works, like it has with Lady Gwen, it magically begins to fall into place.

Wanting an example of sharp style and well tested design? Come for the  Lady Gwen and stay for the capsule collection separates.

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FENDI Prints On – Fendi Ft Nicki Minaj Capsule Collection

If there’s one artist that the Italian fashion house Fendi naturally brings to mind, it would be Nicki Minaj. Throughout the years, the Trini-American rapper has made it a part of her agenda to express her love and appreciation for the brand through her occasional mentions of the brand in several of her most popular songs. So it was no surprise when the brand announced they would finally be launching a capsule collection with the artist.

Titled FENDI Prints On, lit the lyrics from her song Chun Li, the collection created in collaboration with Silvia Venturini Fendi, is set to launch on October 14 and will offer a variety of pieces for women, men and kids.  In the collection , a futuristic approach is taken, where the FF logo all over pattern is combined with metallic textiles, shimmering surfaces and bright colours, from oversized puffers and coats to elevated leisurewear. The accessories also take on the same street like characteristic with the brand’s signature Peekaboo and Baguette bags crafted in a range of bright colours and metallics.

For the launch of the collection, the brand and artist have released a campaign shot by Steven Klein with Minaj as the focal point and a flock of models supporting her. The artist has also teamed up with  rapper PnB Rock and record producer Murda Beatz and to release a new single entitled FENDI which has been released today. The FENDI Prints On capsule collection will be available online from October 14 and sold in 52 Fendi boutiques worldwide two days after.  

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Fragile Face Laid Flat: A coup for Matches Fashion as Venetia Scott turns the focus on her own photography work with gallery duo Sion & Moore

What’s in a face? What expressions do they hold. What do they aim to reveal, and what do they choose to conceal to the viewer.

Venetia Scott, Fashion Director of Vogue whose own photography work spans over a decade, has put the spotlight on some of the most famous faces she has shot, cropping down the image, and spotlighting a tight frame on nothing above the crown and nothing below the neck.

The result? Mesmerising faces entrance and envelop the viewer, as we are caught in their beam. The graininess of the zoom only enhances a sense of retrograde nostalgia about the shots: are we looking back into something or forward?

Scott developed the idea for the work whilst blowing up parts of her images – she noticed that, whilst detail is lost in the zoom, a new quality arises – one that draws you in. The portraits are beautifully eerie, looking as if they might have been taken from missing person files. The face of each girl captivates the viewer but stops short of telling us everything we might want to know. 

The name of the exhibition came about after Venetia saw it written on the side of a packing crate in Paris. Is it a face of fragility or resilience? Is it a two dimensional shot or is the woman looking right back, while sealed in the frame?

With all the images being of faces made famous from fashion shows and magazines, notably many from Venetia’s intrepid career, we are also presented with faces some of us have grown up with and have shaped our ideas of beauty and grace. They are familiar, from Lindsey Wixon to Lineisy Montero Feliz, and yet we hardly know them at all. 

In conjunction with the brilliant Sion & Moore, whose duo of former photography agent Kim Sion and creative consultant Lucy Kumara Moore, director of Claire De Rouen Books, have launched quite the partnership in a contemporary gallery project, the exhibition also heralds a new movement coming into play in Matchesfashion. Exploring the overflow of fashion into other creative spheres, the exhibition hopefully signals many more photography expositions in the 5 Carlos place address. Matchesfashion, as ever, has the finger on the creative pulse, and by celebrating the arts in all its fascinations, they are opening their doors wide for a new stream of showcasing and celebration. 

Fragile Face Laid Flat runs until 28th September at Matchesfashion, 5 Carlos Place, Mayfair, London

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Sustainability, Made in Italy and Women on The Verge of a Nervous Breakdown: A conversation with Marco Rambaldi

Images courtesy of Giacomo Cabrini

Marco Rambaldi is nervous. He is jittering with emotion. We’re sitting backstage moments before the debut of his latest Spring Summer 2020 collection and we’re sipping on champagne, a bubbly remedy which seems to calm his nerves down. 

Marco Rambaldi is nervous just like the women who inspired his latest collection, women on the verge of a nervous breakdown. 

He explains: “We took a different approach to this collection in respect to the others. Whilst before we would always start by looking at a specific time period or a person who would inspire us, this collection was born out of a more abstract idea, a social consideration of the society around us.”

This isn’t the first time that the Bolognese but Milan based designer has made a reflection which veers on the political throughout his clothing. His past collections include references to Italy’s emergence of feminism in the 70s and the socialist student revolts of the late sixties. 

However, this collection, titled ‘Lapse’, is a reflection on the now. It’s a reflection on the broken nature of today’s society and how it is already affecting us currently. 

The IUAV graduate and winner of Camera Della Moda’s Next Generation competition wanted for this theme of broken beauty to be extremely visible throughout the collection, like holes, gatherings are left unmended; whilst straps at a certain point stop and turn into pieces of rope. Knits feature a series of jumping points, designed specifically to create floating threads as if the mesh were broken; the sole of the shoes is designed in a way which doesn’t follow exactly the upper of the shoe, so it seems like it is composed of different pieces of separate shoes. The stitching on the suits is wrong, even though it is evidently handmade as if following the silhouette of another garment. The same thing can be seen in the patterns: flowers from different bouquets are grouped together, whilst pieces of destroyed neo-classical statues float around as if left behind. 

This season is also the first season Rambaldi, who auto-produces his collections, has ventured into accessory, shoe design and production. Yet, the designer doesn’t have plans on expanding his menswear offering yet.

“Not at the moment, but definitely in the future, for now, I want to focus on letting my womenswear collection grow slowly,” he says. 

And the importance of slow production is something which has been stressed quite a lot lately, and of which Rambaldi is very aware of. Being Italian and very proud of his roots (although not of his government – who can blame him!) he is trying to grow his brand slowly until he finds the right distributor who will support his way of thinking and working. 

“I believe young brands like mine can stand out over brands who focus on marketing only if they manage to follow the slow production path, focusing on the importance of Made in Italy and the crafts which are slowly dying because of mass production,” he states. 

Indeed and unfortunately, the death of original craftsmanship is upon us. 

Yet Rambaldi has hope for the future: “I believe that if we’ll manage to teach the importance of going back to the roots to the younger generations, then they’ll understand that they won’t have to follow trends in order to build a successful brand. They must understand that it is crucial they work with what is available to them, developing new ways to work with most often are scraps of materials.”

Well, if these are part of his plans for the future, we can’t wait to see what this young designer has in store for us next. 

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Fendi’s #BaguetteFriendsForever ft. The Surprise Baguette

In the latest episode of their #BaguetteFriendsForever series, Italian fashion house Fendi zooms in on a group inseparable friends in the streets of Tokyo. Taiwanese-based influencer Molly, Chinese supermodel Tianyi, South Korean singer Jung and Japanese actress Ayaka are filmed on a quest to find the secret performance venue of Japanese dancer Mandy Sekiguchi. They start off by catching up at the Seven Eight Café and then dive into a shopping session at the FENDI boutique in Omotesando.

Upon their arrival and the venue , the lights soon flicker on and Mandy appears and begins dancing with his own Baguette , the surprise Baguette. The girls soon join in and share in the celebration,, flaunting their own personal versions of the Baguette as well. 

The brand first launched the campaign #BaguetteFriendsForever earlier this year which included a series of short films featuring the storylines of inseparable groups of friends around the world throughout one of their daily routines which is centred around the iconic Fendi baguette. The first episode was titled “The Baguette is Back” and was an adventure set in the streets of Shanghai China. The second episode Titled “The Missing Baguette,” was shot in Hong Kong. All pieces are currently available in stores worldwide and online, to shop the looks , visit Fendi.

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Milan Fashion Week: Marni SS20 – Act II / Tachitropirina

The mind of Marni’s creative director Francesco Risso has proven to be both a maze as it is a museum especially in the case of metaphors. For his latest show, Act ll , presented during the past weekend in Milan, the designer presented a collection that was inspired by the idea of seeing his fashion as a form of pharmaceutical drug which he called Tachitropirinia, used to treat an imaginary tropical disease.

 “It is recommended for use by all subjects who are hypertensive to tropicalism: bulb women, mangrove ladies, cocoon females, Liana amazons, jungle janes, palm elves,” reads the press release. 

This was brought out through a series of brushstroke prints on garments that wrapped the body like cocoons in a variety of different colours and prints. Flared skirts with balloon smock tops , raw edged painted coats, net dresses , flip flops and all made from accumulations of old  recycled fabrics. For the past few season Risso has managed to drill in the topic of sustainability not only with the physical collection, but with all aspects of his show as well. This season guests all sat on recycled cardboard stools and were surrounded by a tropical jungle of artificial trees created from recycled materials used during Risso’s last two shows. 

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Milan Fashion Week: Arthur Arbesser SS20 – To Grandmother, with love

Austrian designer Arthur Arbesser is one who each season never fails to relay the tales of his rich heritage through his garments. For SS20, the designer drew inspiration from a large box in his late grandmother’s wardrobe. Only a few months ago, Arbesser discovered this box that belonged to his grandmother Mathilde which contained scraps of fabric cut from her own clothes from the 1920’s up until the 1980’s.

From this he was inspired to create a collection in her honour that was crafted in patchwork using a variety of fabrics and leftover scraps from Arthur’s past collections. From silk, to crepe and cotton popeline, all presented in light blues, white, and a variety of several prints. The collection contained several aspects of vintage references including the sailor collars and waistcoats which were tributes to his grandmother during the days when she wore school uniforms. Each piece of fabric had a story as well as the way in which they were crafted, which gave the collection not only a poetic dynamic, but a feel of handmade sincerity. 

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Milan Fashion Week: Fendi SS20 – Solar Flair

Images by : Giuseppe Triscari

Since the passing of her mentor the late Karl Lagerfeld , Silvia Venturini Fendi has taken the bull by the horns and managed to craft interesting collections that which although are sealed with her signature, still remain under house’s codes. For menswear SS20, the designer charged towards a direction where she drew inspiration from the actual seasons as she dreamed about gardening in her holiday home outside of Rome. For womenswear, shown earlier this week , the designer took a similar route, crafting a collection under the theme “Solar Flair.” 

Think summer vacation, which means yes, there were bathing suits , mini skirts, PVC coats, but not only, there was a range of pieces to cover every type of vacation, from a weekend in the alps with a line of fur coats, trenches and knitwear , to simple loungewear for a week’s cruise. Prints took centrestage with a variety of graphic florals as well as the house’s signature paperbag fabric in shorts and trousers from waxed and organic washed cottons. The collection also capitalised on creating going green at least with its accessories, by creating a version of their famous peekaboo bag in compact raffia in addition to a few tote bags, as well as the Baguette which was done with blanket flower marquetry.

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Milan Fashion Week: Prada SS20 Style over Fashion

For SS20 , designer Miuccia Prada took a few steps away from the glamours of fashion to focus on the concept of personal style. Each look from the collection was tailored precisely to fit and highlight the model’s personal and physical attributes. The opening look, a simple grey wool blouse with a white matching skirt and leather loafers. Every one thereafter mirrored this concept of not overshadowing the woman’s personality with the clothes but rather complementing her in subtle simplistic manners. A green velvet summer dress was simply paired with a lilac purple hat and big glasses, a gold leather suit given a simple white collar, put on a bare faced model. Hints of vintage aspects were also sprinkled about the collection with accessories and silhouettes that so likely resembled Prada silhouettes in the late 90’s as well as references of several different eras including the 70’s and 20’s. The collection itself was self referential , and centred around the idea of putting the woman first and clothes second. 

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